IGCSE Handbook 2020

Grade 9 & 10 | Final Examinations: 2020

Table of Contents

  1. School Mission & Vision
  2. Message from the Director
  3. ISH Student Outcomes Secondary
  4. Who Can Help You?
  5. Introduction
  6. BYOD & Equipment List for Secondary School Students
  7. IGCSE Grading and Reporting of Student Achievement
  8. Promotion into Next Grade Level
  9. Academic Honesty & Dishonesty
  10. Learning Support
  11. First Language English
  12. First Language Spanish
  13. World Literature
  14. Spanish Literature
  15. Second Language English
  16. Foreign Languages
  17. International Mathematics
  18. Business Studies
  19. Economics
  20. Global Perspectives
  21. History
  22. Travel and Tourism
  23. Coordinated Sciences
  24. Art & Design
  25. Music
  26. Drama

 

At the International School of Havana we want to encourage, foster and develop students with these characteristics:

 

OUR MISSION


Learning to Make a Difference

THE VISION


 

At the International School of Havana we focus together on our core work of learning, creating a powerful, positive learning culture framed by a common learning language and shared principles. We discover how to learn and how to help others learn.

Acknowledging that everyone is different, we not only embrace and celebrate our differences, but also learn from our diversity. Every member of our community has something to offer that can make a difference, to ourselves, to each other, to our community and, ultimately, to the shared world beyond our school. At the International School of Havana we all learn with a common purpose. We learn to make a difference!

SCHOOL PHILOSOPHY


The philosophy of the school is to create and provide a stimulating, happy, safe, secure and disciplined learning environment that is non-discriminatory as to ethnic origin, gender or religious belief within which students are encouraged to take intellectual risks without being at risk physically.

The school seeks to promote academic excellence by providing the best possible learning environment within an appropriately regulated community that contributes to and abides by its own rules.

The School offers a programme of study principally through the medium of the English language, while also recognising that Spanish and other languages are an important aspect of a student’s experience.

The School seeks to encourage every child to reach full potential by instilling a commitment to lifelong learning, providing a programme of learning support for those that need it and developing international mindedness and global citizenship.

The School further endeavours to foster respect for the different cultures, including that of the host country, which make up both the School and the wider community.

SCHOOL OBJECTIVES


To nurture the whole child within the academic curriculum and through Extra Curricular activities by addressing the emotional, moral, physical, intellectual, social, creative and cultural needs of the students.

To maximise the skills of learning in all students, including those with Special Educational Needs, in order to provide learning experiences enabling students to meet, or preferably exceed, the benchmark learning outcomes and attainment levels set by our curriculum.

To enhance the skills of teaching for all members of the academic staff through an ongoing programme of professional development based on sound, modern educational theory.

To actively encourage parents to become and remain involved in the education of their children through regular reporting of student progress, programmed parent-teacher consultations and the development of home-school collaborative strategies to maximise student achievement.

To promote a sense of care and responsibility in each child, for the School, host country and larger global ecological and educational environment through field- trips, projects, exchanges and other activities within the curriculum.

 Message from the Director


Welcome to the International School of Havana!

For some, this will be a return to ISH and for others, you will be joining the community for the first time. For all, I hope that this school year will be a most fulfilling experience for students, families and our entire community.

At the International School of Havana we focus together on our core work of creating a powerful, positive learning culture framed by a common language and shared principles. We discover how to learn and how to help others learn.

Acknowledging that everyone is different, we embrace and celebrate our differences, and learn from our diversity. Every member of our community has something to offer that can make a difference, to ourselves, to each other, to our community and, ultimately, to the shared world beyond our school. At the International School of Havana we all learn with a common purpose. We learn to make a difference!

This handbook is a guide for both students and parents to help you understand our educational goals as well as the expectations the school has for you as essential partners in learning. With a fundamental commitment to student-centred education, ISH offers a full and varied curricular and extra-curricular program, designed to provide a rigorous journey of learning for each and every student.

We recognize and value the individual talents, interests and innate sense of curiosity in each of us.  Our aim is to provide a challenging and supportive environment within which students will flourish.

It is my sincere belief that there is no more noble and important a profession than education. In this dynamic and often challenging global environment, we are called upon to foster the continual development of young people to become the leaders and caretakers of our planet; and in so doing, make it a better, more peaceful and sustainable place to live and thrive. This is a foundational purpose of teaching and all those who support it.

One of my favourite proverbs, originating from Nigeria, says, “It takes a whole village to raise a child.” I believe this fundamentally and hope to help contribute to the development of a caring and collaborative village, all of whose members join together in raising our children.  As such, it is our expectation that all parents will partner with the school and contribute positively towards our community of learners.

Within these pages, you will find much of what the school does and how we do it. Over the course of the year, through communications with teachers, administrators and other school personnel, we expect your essential learning about the school to be enhanced further. The quality of that learning, however, will depend largely on you and the level of engagement you invest in your learning about the school and its multiple offerings. Although this handbook covers a broad scope, its contents are not exhaustive and may over time, be revised.  When that happens, the school will communicate important happenings and changes in order to keep you informed.

On behalf of our faculty and staff, I welcome you and your child to our ‘village’ – whether returning or new to the school – and hope that each of you has a rewarding and enriching year ahead at the International School of Havana.

In partnership, Michael Lees Director

International School of Havana

ISH Student Outcomes Secondary School


At the end of the Secondary School experience an ideal ISH student will be:

an effective communicator who:
  • can read,  write, speak and listen effectively;
  • can enquire, search for, find, use and present information;
  • can talk about his/her feelings and empathise with the feelings of others.
a higher level thinker and learner who:
  • accepts and thinks about new and different ideas;
  • is able to apply what he/she knows to the real world;
  • plans and arranges his/her work and time well;
  • thinks about problems and creates solutions by identifying different approaches and deciding which one(s) to use;
  • is able to work alone or as part of a group or team;
  •  is proficient in the use of ICT;
  • reflects upon what he/she has learned;
  • asks and answers the, “what if” questions raised by his/her studies;
  • uses all the available opportunities to learn wisely ;
  • takes responsibility for the quality of his/her work;
  • uses opportunities to learn more profoundly in areas that interest him/her;
  • is able to learn from and support the learning of his/her classmates;
  • is able to understand big ideas and see a big picture in his/her learning;
  • adopts the attitudes of a lifelong learner.
a responsible and contributory citizen within the ISH multi-cultural society who:
  • is self disciplined and obeys the school and class rules;
  • is honest in his/her behaviour and work;
  • can address his/her own needs for physical, mental and emotional health;
  • understands, values and respects who he/she is and who others are in our society;
  • respects everyone’s needs, ideas and beliefs ;
  • acts in a way that is safe for him/herself and others;
  • understands different cultures, including his/her own, through art, music, literature and drama;
  • participates actively in all aspects of school life;
  • understands the need to protect the environment and acts accordingly;
  • understands and acts as a member of the global society.

Who Can Help You?


If you need help on any aspect of the IGCSE programme please consult the relevant subject teacher or the Coordinator.

Crystal Barnes | 9 & 10 Coordinator

Introduction


This booklet should contain all the information you need to be fully aware of the nature of the programme of study that is offered and taught at ISH for Grade 9 and Grade 10.

The General Information section contains an overview of the curriculum, and the origin and nature of the IGCSE (International General Certificate of Secondary Education) programme.

There are specific course outlines for each of the courses that are on offer within the programme including those that are compulsory and those that are not. In addition to the academic subjects, students are required to follow Physical Education although this subject is not examined by the IGCSE, unless it is chosen as an exam option.

The grading system for this part of our school curriculum is explained. Finally, advice on who you can consult is given if you have any questions that are not addressed within the booklet.

General Information

The IGCSE is a two-year educational programme that is set and externally examined by the University of Cambridge International Assessment Examinations (CAIE) in the United Kingdom.

Its standards are derived from the UK standards set in the GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) but the programme is driven by curriculum content specifically tailored to the needs of students studying in international schools around the world.

The programme is designed to stand alone and so no previous knowledge is required to be a part of the programme. However, students need to be at a functional level of English to have reasonable expectations of success from enrolment in the IGCSE Programme.

Students that have followed courses that have prepared them with the skills and attitudes that are an integral part of the IGCSE programme have a considerable advantage.

At the end of Grade 10, most students will sit individual IGCSE examinations in at least seven of the subjects presented in this handbook.

The School aims to make all subjects available but actual availability depends upon the viability of group sizes and contracted staff’s ability to teach the courses.

Is There a Choice of Subjects & Programme?

Yes and no!

All students that follow the School’s taught programme will follow the IGCSE programme in Grades 9 and 10.

Within the IGCSE programme the School is able to offer a range of subject choices as shown in the table below.

The following subjects are compulsory:

  • English (First or Second Language)  3 hours per week
  • Cambridge International Mathematics  3 hours per week
  • Coordinated Sciences (Double Award)  6 hours per week
  • Physical Education

Option Blocks.

Languages
Spanish First
|or|
Spanish Foreign
|or|
French Foreign

Literature
World Literature in English
|or|
Spanish Literature

Social Studies 1
History
|or|
Economics

Social Studies 2
Global Perspectives
|or|
Business Studies

Creative
Art & Design
|or|
Music*
|or|
Drama

Language

Spanish First OR Spanish Foreign OR French Foreign

* Candidates beginning Music are expected to have a minimum of some background in practical music making.

Bring Your Own Device


ISH recognises, fosters and encourages the use of technology to complement and enhance student learning. Electronic devices constitute a learning platform that facilitates inquiry, efficient collaborative work, problem solving and communication. ISH provides wireless network access as well as a safe digital environment. Accordingly, from August 2018 all ISH students from Grades 9 to 12 will be required to have access to a personal device for use at school.

Research shows that the use of electronic devices has the greatest impact when those devices are the property, of and therefore cater to, the preference of the user. For this reason we are not prescriptive regarding the type of device, provided it conforms with the following guidelines:

  • Hardware, the operating system and applications (programmes) must work together and be useful for the purposes of learning.
  • The device must be able to access a variety of web-based applications using common protocols and languages.
  • It must be able to connect to a 802.11 b/g/n wireless network.
  • It must be able to connect to an external display, any connectors or adaptors required to do so must be supplied by the owner. The new campus will be equipped with HDMI cables.
  • It must have a working battery and power supply.  The school has North-American style power outlets.  Any adaptors needed must be supplied by the student.
  • It must be able to access, save, export files to an external storage device (minimum: 64GB).
  • It must have sufficient storage space.
  • It is recommended that the device be able to record sound and video.
  • A physical keyboard is highly recommended.

And meets the following software requirements:

  • A word processing application that can read and save .docx.
  • A spreadsheet application that can open and save .xlsx.
  • A presentation application that can open and save .pptx.
  • An application that can open, edit, and save .pdf.
  • A web browser: Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome are recommended. Windows-based computers please note that Internet Explorer is not compatible with some school systems.
  • An operating system or application that allows you to transfer files to and from the device.
  • Students may be required to have additional subject-specific software.
  • Windows-based computers must have up-to-date anti-virus software. Owners are responsible for the installation and updates of this software.
  • A universally compatible audio/video player. One example of such an application is VLC.
Responsibilities

Parents are responsible for purchasing the device. This device remains the property of the student/family. If you have not yet arrived and/or are new to Cuba DO NOT assume that you will be able to get a device here. Plan to procure a device and applications abroad.

Students are solely responsible for their device. Parents must ensure that students are aware of this. This includes the operating system, applications and hardware of the device. The school will extend support for connectivity within the school.

  • Devices must be clearly labelled with the student’s name and grade.
  • Owners are responsible for updates or repairs.
  • ISH takes no responsibility for the security of student-owned technology. ISH is not responsible for lost or stolen devices, nor does ISH take any financial responsibility towards damaged or stolen devices.
  • This device is considered a tool for lessons, just as pencils and paper. As such, students are expected to bring their device to school at all times. There are an extremely limited number or devices available for short term loan in cases of emergency. If a student forgets his/ her device repeatedly, consequences will be given by the Teacher/ Coordinator/Principal.
  • If the device is not needed (eg. P.E. lessons, field trips), it must be locked in the student’s locker.
GUIDELINES AND REGULATIONS
  • Students must adhere to the ISH IT Acceptable Use Policy and follow the Cyber-conduct and Cyber-Bullying Policy.
  • Students may use their personal device in the classroom for educational purposes under the teacher’s or staff member’s discretion.
  • During lessons the use of social media or online games is not allowed, unless permitted by a teacher.
  • Devices must be password-protected.
  • We advise that students do not loan a personal device to another student. Under normal circumstances, only the owner of the device should use it, unless otherwise indicated by a teacher.
  • Students may not take, transmit or post pictures, videos or audio recordings of any members of the school community while on school premises, unless consent is specifically given by the subject of the picture/video/audio recording. 
  • Devices must not disrupt lessons in any way and must be kept silent at all times, unless permission is granted by a teacher.
  • Students must always comply with the teacher’s request when asked to shut down their device or close the screen.
  • Students are responsible for keeping their documents and folders organised and making regular back-ups of their school work.
  • The school may require software to be installed on devices as needed. Families will be informed of these requirements as and when they arise.

Equipment Required for Learning

The ISH requires its students to be properly equipped to carry out all work required of them in their daily studies and homework. These items can be found in Cuba, but are not always available.

  • Pens: black, blue and red
  • Pencils
  • Highlighter pens
  • Notebooks
  • Calculators: Graphical Calculator TI-84+.
    Please speak with the Mathematics department if you require further details.
  • For PE lessons, the ISH PE uniform and proper sports shoes
    (The uniform can be bought from the school.)
  • Drawing equipment: metric ruler, set squares, compass and protractor
other Suggested equipment

These items can be found in Cuba, but are not always available.

  • Coloured pencils
  • Pencil sharpener, eraser and glue stick
  • File ring binders or folders for students working with them
  • File organiser for homework and handouts
  • Dictionaries: English First Language/English translating dictionary
The School will provide:
  • All necessary textbooks
  • A homework diary
  • A locker to store personal and school property

Students and parents are advised that for reasons of security all items should bear the student’s name. ISH expects that all the above items will be replaced immediately if they are lost or used and will do likewise for items that are provided for students. In the case of school items lost  by the student, a charge will be made for the issue of replacement items.

IGCSE Grading and Reporting of Student Achievement


In addition to internal assessments and reporting, students studying IGCSE subjects are also graded using externally set assessment tools and grading systems.

Throughout the programme it is important that all stake holders: students, parents and teachers, can measure performance relative to these external standards.  For this reason, a Grade Summary is included with each report.

The expectations and grades awarded in this summary are based entirely on student work representative of Cambridge International Examination (CAIE) standards completed up to the end of the reporting period. It is not a measure of how a student would perform if they were to complete the final assessment(s) for a given course at the time the report is issued.

Promotion into Next Grade Level


At the conclusion of Grade 9 the progress of all students in the IGCSE programme is reviewed to determine if a student should progress to the final year of the programme.

The school considers many variables in determining if a student will be promoted to the next grade, including but not limited to:

  • Performance against the standards set by CAIE represented by grades awarded in the Grade Summary.
  • Demonstration of Competencies and Learning Behaviours in each subject;
  • Satisfactory completion of extra ISH requirements such as ISH PE.
  • Attendance record: the promotion of any student in any grade is automatically reviewed if they have not met the minimum attendance requirement of 90% as documented in our Attendance Policy. Please ask for a copy if you need more information regarding our expectations of student attendance.

At all times the present and future well being of the student is paramount when evaluating the promotion of a student.

Academic Honesty & Dishonesty


Academic honesty occurs when a person who presents someone else’s work, acknowledges the author of the work. This can be done through footnoting the author of the ideas incorporated, or by providing a bibliography of books, websites and news articles used with clear citing in the text. It is therefore important to keep track of all sources used and the date they were accessed in case of websites or newspaper articles. It is also important to add the citing the moment a source is used, so it will not be forgotten.

Academic dishonesty (or plagiarism) is the opposite of academic honesty and occurs when other people’s work is presented as his or her own, including tutor’s work. Plagiarism is a serious offence with serious consequences.

There are four things all students should know about the consequences of plagiarism:

1)  Academic dishonesty is a serious offence

Teachers are expected to report all instances of plagiarism to the Principal. Students found guilty will have this entered into their record. There is never any possible circumstance where academic dishonesty can be allowed.

2)  Academic dishonesty in most instances is easy to identify and expose

The very force that makes plagiarism easy and tempting to some students–the internet–makes its detection easy. Most teachers can locate the source of suspected plagiarism within a few minutes of searching the web. In this context, plagiarism is as much ignorance as it is dishonesty.

3)  All parties involved in plagiarism are considered equally guilty

If you share your coursework with another student and he or she plagiarizes it, you are considered as guilty as the one who has plagiarized your work, since you enabled the plagiarism to take place. Under no circumstances should a student make his or her coursework available to another student unless the teacher gives explicit permission for this to happen.

4)  Suspected dishonesty is a reason not to accept student work

Teachers know their students and therefore have a good idea of their writing style, among other things that make plagiarism detectable. This makes teachers highly qualified to judge work handed in as genuinely the student’s work or not. A teacher has the right to refuse work that is seen to be suspicious. It will be up to the students to prove that the work is solely done by him or her.

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty

Students who have been reported, investigated and determined to be in contradiction to the policy and what it stands for will face the following consequences:

First Infraction:

Mark of 0% on the work in question which may include any other established penalty or consequence as outlined by the relevant teacher or phase level coordinator. If there is reasonable doubt about the student having misunderstood what academic dishonesty is, he/she might be given a chance to make up for the work and remove the 0% from the marks list.

Second Infraction:

Mark of 0% on the work in question which may include any other established penalty or consequence as outlined by the said teacher or phase level coordinator.

Student’s name will be placed on the infraction registrar and will be reported to the Principal.

A meeting with parents/guardians is called to help the student to understand the consequences of his/her action.

Ensuing Infractions:

A disciplinary hearing will be held with parents/guardians, the student and selected staff members. Normal disciplinary action can be taken including suspension and expulsion.

NOTE: Infractions should not prevent a student from being promoted if criteria for promotion have been met.

Show Academic Honesty by Citing Sources Properly

Copying someone’s work is an extreme and straightforward act of plagiarism. More commonly, however, students plagiarize without realizing they are doing so. This generally happens when a student fails to acknowledge the source of an idea or phrasing. While unintentional plagiarism is generally treated more leniently than intentional plagiarism, it is nonetheless a sign of sloppiness and/or failure to educate oneself about the nature of plagiarism.

In any specific case, if you are unsure about what is acceptable and what is not, the best thing is to ask your teacher.  In general, it is better to err on the side of over-citation than under-citation. Besides, this shows that you are serious about the material you read.

Learning Support


Learning Support is available for those students in Grades 9 and 10 that are identified under the school’s referral system or for those students that present evidence, at admission, of a diagnosed and documented Special Educational Need.

In order to qualify for IGCSE Cambridge examination allowances, individual cases for students in Grades 9 and 10 have to be submitted to Cambridge with supporting documentation.

Cambridge will approve allowances on an individual basis.

Teachers can refer students to the Learning Support Department if they have or appear to:

  • be achieving below grade level expectations;
  • be achieving above grade level expectations;
  • have specific language difficulties, i.e. Reading, writing, spelling, comprehension, mathematics.

Once students are referred, the Learning Support begins a process of consultation. This process can, but does not always include the following:

  • Recommendations and/or support with study/homework/organizational habits.
  • Recommendations, adjustments and/or differentiation at the classroom level.
  • Educational assessments (achievement, cognitive, self esteem and behavioural).
  • Direct interventions for specific difficulties, in the Learning Support Department.
  • In class assistance through the Learning Support Department.
  • Intensive withdrawal classes to develop basic skills and strategies for specific periods of time.
  • Consultations with teachers, students and parents.
  • Test taking and exam preparation extracurricular classes.
  • Individual Education Plans and the process that goes along with these plans.

The purpose of learning support assistance is to ensure that students’ needs and strengths are identified and addressed as early as possible.

The aim is to give support and strategies to the student, school and home components. The role is to provide a support network that will allow students to become more independent learners with better skills for lifelong learning.

First Language English


Brief Description of the Course

Cambridge IGCSE First Language English offers candidates the opportunity to respond with understanding to a rich array of reading texts during the course as a whole. Candidates will use these texts to inform and inspire their own writing, and write in a range of text types for different purposes and audiences. 


Aims of the Programme

 The aims are to enable students to:

  • read a wide range of texts, fluently and with good understanding, enjoying and appreciating a variety of language 

  • read critically, and use knowledge gained from wide reading to inform and improve their own writing 

  • write accurately and effectively, using language appropriately 

  • work with information and with ideas in language by developing skills of evaluation, analysis, use and inference 

  • listen to, understand, and use spoken language effectively 

  • acquire and apply a wide vocabulary, alongside a knowledge and understanding of grammatical terminology and linguistic conventions.
Topics Studied

Some examples: autobiography writing, monologue writing, travel writing, short story writing, advertising analysis, essay writing, consumer reports, argumentative/persuasive writing, speech writing, summary writing, dialogue writing, descriptive/narrative writing.

Scheme of Assessment

Candidates must complete Paper 1 and one of either Paper 2 or Coursework Portfolio

EXAMINATIONS:

Paper 1: Reading

Duration:
1 hour 20 minutes

Weight:
50%

Details:
Structured and extended writing questions. Questions will be based on three reading texts.

Paper 2: Directed Writing and Composition

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
50%

Details:
Extended writing question and a composition task

COURSEWORK:

Weight:
50%

Details:
Coursework Portfolio consisting of three extended writing assignments.
Internally assessed and externally moderated by CAIE

 

First Language Spanish


Brief Description of the Course

Cambridge IGCSE First Language Spanish is designed for learners whose mother tongue is Spanish. The course allows learners to:

  • develop the ability to communicate clearly, accurately and effectively when speaking and writing
  • learn how to use a wide range of vocabulary, and the correct grammar, spelling and punctuation 

  • develop a personal style and an awareness of the audience being addressed.

Learners are also encouraged to read widely, both for their own enjoyment and to further their awareness of the ways in which Spanish can be used. Cambridge IGCSE First Language Spanish also develops more general analysis and communication skills such as synthesis, inference, and the ability to order facts and present opinions effectively. 



Aims of the Programm

The aims are to enable students to:

  • enable candidates to understand and respond to what they hear, read and experience
  • enable candidates to communicate accurately, appropriately, confidently and effectively
  • encourage candidates to enjoy and appreciate a variety of language 

  • complement candidates’ ability to work with information and ideas in other areas of study, for example, by developing skills of analysis, synthesis and the drawing of inferences 

  • promote candidates’ personal development and an understanding of themselves and others.
Topics Studied
  • Some examples: autobiography writing, monologue writing, travel writing, short story writing, advertising analysis, essay writing, consumer reports, argumentative/persuasive writing, speech writing, summary writing, dialogue writing, descriptive/narrative writing.
Scheme of Assessment

Candidates must complete Paper 1 OR Paper 2 and Paper 3

Examinations:

Paper 1: Reading Passages (CORE)

Duration:
1 hour 45 minutes

Weight:
50%

Details:
Candidates answer three questions on two passages. Passage A will be 500–600 words long and Passage B will be 300–350 words long.
NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

Paper 2: Reading Passages (EXTENDED)

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
50%

Details:
Candidates answer three questions on two passages. Passage A will be 650–750 words long and Passage B will be 550–650 words long.

 

Paper 3: Directed Writing and Composition

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
50%

Details:
Candidates answer one question on a passage or passages totaling 650–750 words, and complete a composition task from a choice of four titles.

 

World Literature


Brief Description of the Course

This syllabus offers learners the opportunity to read, interpret, evaluate and respond to a range of literature in English. The range includes drama, prose and poetry from the works of Shakespeare to contemporary literature. This course enables learners to deepen their understanding and appreciation of the ways in which writers use English to express meaning and achieve effects. It will stimulate learners to read for pleasure, to explore wider and universal issues, promoting a better understanding of themselves and the world.

Aims of the Programme

The syllabus aims, which are not listed in order of priority, are to encourage and develop candidates’ ability to:

  • enjoy the experience of reading world literature;
  • understand and respond to literary texts in different forms and from different periods and cultures;
  • communicate an informed personal response appropriately and effectively;
  • appreciate different ways in which writers achieve their effects;
  • experience literature’s contribution to aesthetic, imaginative and intellectual growth;
  • explore the contribution of literature to an understanding of areas of human concern.
Assessment Objectives

There are four Assessment Objectives and candidates are assessed on their ability to:

  • show detailed knowledge of the content and form of literary texts drawn from different countries and cultures;
  • engage with writers’ ideas and treatment of themes, and appreciate how texts relate to wider contexts; 

  • recognise and appreciate of how writers create and shape meanings and effects;
  • empathise, through re-creation of a character’s voice and thoughts.
Topics Studied

Drama, Poetry, Novel/Short Stories, essay writing, literary features and analysis.

Scheme of Assessment

Examinations:

Paper 2: Unseen

Duration:
1 hour 15 minutes

Weight:
25%

Details:
Candidates answer one question on one piece of previously unseen piece of writing – poetry or prose

 

Paper 3: Set Text

Duration:
1 hour15 minutes

Weight:
25%

Details:
Candidates answer two questions – one extract-based question and one general essay question.

 

Coursework:

Weight:
50%

Details:
Coursework Portfolio consisting of two written assignments and one oral assignment.

Spanish Literature

The School is able to offer Spanish Literature for qualified candidates.

Under normal circumstances, native speaker or near native speaker status is the criterion for studying an externally examined Literature course.

Brief Description of the Course

This syllabus offers learners the opportunity to read, interpret, evaluate and respond to a range of literature in Spanish. The range includes drama, prose and poetry from the works of Shakespeare

to contemporary literature. This course enables learners to deepen their understanding and appreciation of the ways in which writers use Spanish to express meaning and achieve effects. It will stimulate learners to read for pleasure, to explore wider and universal issues, promoting a better understanding of themselves and the world.

Syllabus Aims

The syllabus aims, which are not listed in order of priority, are to encourage and develop students’ ability to:

  • enjoy the experience of reading literature;
  • understand and respond to literary texts in different forms and from different periods and cultures;
  • communicate an informed personal response appropriately and effectively;
  • appreciate different ways in which writers achieve their effects;
  • experience the contribution of literature to aesthetic, imaginative and intellectual growth;
  • explore the contribution of literature to an understanding of areas of human concern.
Assessment Objectives

Students are assessed on their ability to:

  •  show detailed knowledge of the content of literary texts in at least two of the three main forms (Drama, Poetry, and Prose);
  • understand the meanings of literary texts and their contexts, and explore texts beyond surface meanings to show deeper awareness of ideas and attitudes;
  • recognise and appreciate ways in which writers use language, structure, and form to create and shape meanings and effects;
  • communicate a sensitive and informed personal response to literary texts.
Scheme of Assessment

Examinations:

Paper 1: Set texts, open book

Duration:
2 hour 15 minutes

Weight:
75%

Details:
Candidates answer three questions, one from each genre studied: poetry, drama, prose

 

Paper 3: Passage Analysis Unseen Text

Duration:
1 hour20 minutes

Weight:
25%

Details:
Candidates read an unseen text (poetry or prose) and respond using literary analysis techniques.

Second Language English

Brief Description of the Course

Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language offers learners the opportunity to develop practical communication skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. 
Learners will be presented with a variety of stimuli that will build up their skills in reading and writing. They will learn to select relevant details, understand the difference between what is directly stated and implied, and practise writing for different purposes and audiences. Learners will listen to a range of spoken material, including talks and conversations, in order to develop listening skills. Learners will engage in conversations on a variety of topics, and develop their skills in responding to different situations and audiences with a degree of accuracy and clarity. 
Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language will enable learners to become independent users of English, and to be able to use English to communicate effectively in a variety of practical contexts. 


Syllabus Aims

The aims of Cambridge IGCSE English Second Language course are to:

  • develop learners’ ability to use English effectively for the purpose of practical communication 

  • form a solid foundation for the skills required for further study or employment using English as the medium 

  • develop learners’ awareness of the nature of language and language-learning skills 

  • promote learners’ personal development. 

Assessment Objectives

The assessment objectives in Second Language have been grouped according to the four skill areas tested by the examination as follows:

Receptive Skills (Listening & Reading), Students should be able to:

  • identify and retrieve facts and details;
  • understand and select relevant information;
  • recognize and ideas, opinions and attitudes and the connections between related ideas;
  • understand what is implied but not actually stated/written, e.g., gist, relationships, speaker’s/ writer’s purpose/ intention, feelings, situation or place.

Productive Skills (Speaking & Writing), Students should be able to:

  • communicate clearly, accurately and appropriately;
  • convey information and express opinions effectively;
  • employ and control a variety of grammatical structures;
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a range of appropriate vocabulary;
  • observe conventions of paragraphing, punctuation and spelling (Writing);
  • employ appropriate register/ style (Writing);
  • engage in and influence the direction of conversation;
  • employ suitable pronunciation and stress patterns.
Assessment English as a Second Language

Candidates may be assessed with either the speaking component separate endorsement OR with speaking component contributing 20% to the final mark. Regardless of the assessment path taken, candidates may elect to be assessed on either the core or extended material.  Candidates assessed on the core only are able to earn a maximum grade of C.

Candidates being assessed on the core complete Paper 1, Paper 3.
Candidates being assessed on extended material complete Paper 2, Paper 4.
ALL Candidates complete component 5

English as a Second Language – Scheme of Assessment

 

Speaking Endorsement (Speaking component is NOT included in the final grade)

Examinations:

Paper 1: Reading and Writing (CORE)

Duration:
1 hour 30 minutes

Weight:
70%

Details:
Candidates complete six exercises, testing a range of reading and writing skills.
NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

Paper 2: Reading and Writing (EXTENDED)

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
70%

Details:
Candidates complete six exercises, testing a range of reading and writing skills.

 

Paper 3: Listening (Core)

Duration:
Approximately 40 minutes

Weight:
30%

Details:
Candidates listen to several short extracts and longer texts, and complete a range of task types, including short-answer questions, gap filling, matching, multiple choice and note- making.
NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

 Paper 4: Listening (EXTENDED)

Duration:
Approximately 50 minutes

Weight:
30%

Details:
Candidates listen to several short extracts and longer texts, and complete a range of task types, including short-answer questions, gap filling, matching, multiple choice and note- making.
NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

Component 5: Speaking Endorsement

Duration:
Approximately 10-15 minutes

Weight:
Marks for the Speaking component do not contribute to the overall grade candidates receive for the written components. Instead, where candidates perform to an appropriate standard, certificates record separately the achievements of candidates, with grades 1 (high) to 5 (low) for speaking.

Details:
Following a 2–3 minute warm-up conversation, candidates engage in a 6–9 minute discussion with the examiner on a given topic.
Internally assessed/externally moderated

Count-in Speaking (Speaking component is included in the final grade)

Examinations:

Paper 1: Reading and Writing (CORE)

Duration:
1 hour 30 minutes

Weight:
60%

Details:
Candidates complete six exercises, testing a range of reading and writing skills.
NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

Paper 2: Reading and Writing (EXTENDED)

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
60%

Details:
Candidates complete six exercises, testing a range of reading and writing skills.

 

Paper 3: Listening (Core)

Duration:
Approximately 40 minutes

Weight:
20%

Details:
Candidates listen to several short extracts and longer texts, and complete a range of task types, including short-answer questions, gap filling, matching, multiple choice and note- making.
NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

Paper 4: Listening (EXTENDED)

Duration:
Approximately 50 minutes

Weight:
20%

Details:
Candidates listen to several short extracts and longer texts, and complete a range of task types, including short-answer questions, gap filling, matching, multiple choice and note- making.
NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

Component 5: Speaking

Duration:
Approximately 10-15 minutes

Weight:
20%

Details:
Following a 2–3 minute warm-up conversation, candidates engage in a 6–9 minute discussion with the examiner on a given topic.
Internally assessed/externally moderated

 

 

Foreign Languages


Brief Description of the Course

This course encourages learners to develop lifelong skills, including the ability to use a foreign language as a means of practical communication.  It helps students to gain insight into the culture and civilisation of countries where the language is spoken and develop a positive attitude towards language learning, towards the speakers of other languages, and towards other cultures and civilisations. Learners develop techniques, which can be applied to other areas of learning, such as analysis and memory skills, and gain a sound foundation for progression to employment or further study.

Syllabus Aims

This syllabus aims to:

  • develop the ability to communicate effectively using the target language;
  • offer insights into the culture and society of countries where the language is spoken;
  • develop awareness of the nature of language and language learning;
  • encourage positive attitudes towards speakers of other languages and a sympathetic approach to other cultures and civilisations;
  • provide enjoyment and intellectual stimulation
  • develop transferable skills (e.g. analysis, memorising, drawing of inferences) to complement other areas of the curriculum;
  • form a sound base of the skills, language and attitudes required for progression to work or further study, either in the target language or another subject area.
Assessment Objectives

The assessment objectives in Foreign Language have been grouped according to the four skill areas tested by the examination as follows:

  • Understand extended speech and follow complex lines of arguments on familiar topics.
  • Identify attitudes and complex relationships between ideas in different audio texts (fiction and non-fiction).
  • Show grammar and word formation pattern awareness to deduce the meaning of new phrases and words.
  • Understand texts containing everyday and professional- academic language, including a wide variety of structures and verbal tenses.
  • Understand opinions, attitudes, and moods in accurate lexical register.
  • Sustain a straightforward description of experiences and events with reasonable fluency
  • deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
  • Express in writing ideas, feelings and opinions with the purpose of informing, calling someone’s attention or convincing.
  • Use a wide range of vocabulary, complex structures, verbal tenses and structural elements.
  • Demonstrate appropriate control of syntax, grammar, spelling and punctuation marks through edition and self correction.

 

Spanish or French as a Foreign Language – Scheme of Assessment

Examinations:

Paper 1: Listening

Duration:
Approximately 40 minutes

Weight:
25%

Details:
Candidates listen to a number of recordings and answer questions testing comprehension.

 

Paper 2: Reading

Duration:
1 hour

Weight:
25%

Details:
Candidates read a number of texts and answer questions testing comprehension.

 

Paper 3: Speaking

Duration:
Approximately 15 minutes

Weight:
25%

Details:
Candidates complete two role plays, a topic presentation/conversation and a general conversation.
Internally assessed and externally moderated by CAIE

 

Paper 4: Writing

Duration:
1 hour

Weight:
25%

Details:
Candidates respond in the target language to three tasks

International Mathematics


Brief Description of the Course

This course is intended for students to become more fluent in making connections between different areas of mathematics, and develop their profiCAIEncy in the subject. Building on their understanding of numbers and geometry, the students then explain their reasoning with increasing confidence, collect data and learn statistical techniques to analyse data, and use ICT to interpret and present their results.

The Aims of the Programme
  • The aims of the curriculum are the same for all students and are to:
  • develop mathematical skills and apply them to other subjects and to the real world 

  • develop methods of problem-solving 

  • interpret mathematical results and understand their significance 

  • develop patience and persistence in solving problems 

  • develop a positive attitude towards mathematics which encourages enjoyment, fosters confidence and promotes enquiry and further learning 

  • appreciate the elegance of mathematics 

  • appreciate the difference between mathematical proof and pattern spotting 

  • appreciate the interdependence of different branches of mathematics and the links with other disciplines 

  • appreciate the international aspect of mathematics, its cultural and historical significance and its role in the real world 

  • read mathematics and communicate the subject in a variety of ways 

  • acquire a foundation of mathematical skills appropriate to further study and continued learning in 
mathematics. 

 Assessment Objectives
  • The examination will test the ability of candidates to:
  • know and apply concepts from all the aspects of mathematics listed in the specification;
  • apply combinations of mathematical skills and techniques to solve a problem;
  • solve a problem by investigation, analysis, the use of deductive skills and the application of an appropriate strategy;
  • recognise patterns and structures and so form generalisations;
  • draw logical conclusions from information and understand the significance of mathematical or statistical results;
  • use spatial relationships in solving problems;
  • use the concepts of mathematical modelling to describe a real-life situation and draw conclusions;
  • organise, interpret and present information in written, tabular, graphical and diagrammatic forms;
  • use statistical techniques to explore relationships in the real world;
  • communicate mathematical work using the correct mathematical notation and terminology, logical argument, diagrams and graphs;
  • make effective use of technology;
  • estimate and work to appropriate degrees of accuracy.
Students Need to Provide:
  • An exercise book for class work and for homework.
  • A Graphical calculator: Texas Instruments 84+. This calculator is an essential tool for the course and can be bought from the school.
Scheme of Assessment

All candidates take three papers.
Candidates who have studied the Core syllabus content should be entered for Paper 1, Paper 3 and Paper 5. These candidates are eligible for maximun grade C.

Candidates who have studied the Extended syllabus content should be entered for Paper 2, Paper 4 and Paper 6.

Candidates should have a graphic display calculator for Papers 3, 4, 5 and 6.

Core Candidates take:

Paper 1: Short-answer (CORE)

Duration:
45 minutes

Weight:
25%

Details:
Candidates complete short-answer questions based on the Core curriculum.
Calculators are not permitted

NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

Paper 3 Structured Questions (CORE)

Duration:
1 hour 45 minutes

Weight:
60%

Details:
Candidates complete structured questions based on the Core curriculum
Graphic display calculators are required

NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

Paper 5: Investigation (CORE)

Duration:
1 hour 10 minutes

Weight:
15%

Details:
Candidates complete one investigative task based on the Core curriculum
Graphic display calculators are required

NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

 

 

Extended Candidates take:

Paper 2: Short-answer (Extended)

Duration:
45 minutes

Weight:
20%

Details:
Candidates complete short-answer questions based on the extended curriculum.
Calculators are not permitted

Paper 4 Structured Questions (EXTENDED)

Duration:
2 hours 15 minutes

Weight:
60%

Details:
Candidates complete structured questions based on the Extended curriculum
Graphic display calculators are required

Paper 5: Investigation and Modelling (EXTENDED)

Duration:
1 hour 40 minutes

Weight:
20%

Details:
Candidates complete one investigative task and one modelling task based on the Extended curriculum
Graphic display calculators are required

 

Business Studies


Brief Description of the Course

In Business Studies, learners will be able to understand different forms of business organisations, the environments in which businesses operate and business functions such as marketing, operations and finance. They learn to appreciate the role of people in business success. They will also gain lifelong skills, including the ability to calculate and interpret business data, as well as communication skills needed to support arguments with reasons. Additionally, they will develop the ability to analyse business situations and reach decisions or judgements.

Aims of the Programme

The aims, which are not listed in order of priority, are to enable candidates to:

  •  make effective use of relevant terminology, concepts and methods, and recognise the strengths and limitations of the ideas used in business
  • apply their knowledge and critical understanding to current issues and problems in a wide range of business contexts
  • distinguish between facts and opinions, and evaluate qualitative and quantitative data in order to help build arguments and make informed judgements
  • appreciate the perspectives of a range of stakeholders in relation to the business environment, individuals, society, government and enterprise
  • develop knowledge and understanding of the major groups and organisations within and outside business, and consider ways in which they are able to influence objectives, decisions and activities
  • develop knowledge and understanding of how the main types of businesses are organised, financed and operated, and how their relations with other organisations, consumers, employees, owners and society are regulated
  • develop skills of numeracy, literacy, enquiry, selection and use of relevant sources of information, presentation and interpretation
  • develop an awareness of the nature and significance of innovation and change within the context of business activities.
Assessment Objectives

Candidates should be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of facts, terms, concepts, conventions, theories and techniques commonly applied to or used as part of business behaviour.
  • apply their knowledge and understanding of facts, terms, concepts, conventions, theories and techniques.
  • distinguish between evidence and opinion in a business context
  • order, analyse and interpret information in narrative, numerical and graphical forms, using appropriate techniques.
  • present reasoned explanations, develop arguments, understand implications and draw inferences
  • make judgements, recommendations and decisions.
Topics Studied
  • Understanding business activity
  • People in business
  • Marketing
  • Operations management
  • Financial information and decisions
  • External influences on business activity
Scheme of Assessment

Examinations:

Paper 1:

Duration:
1 hour 30 minutes

Weight:
50%

Details:
Candidates answer four questions requiring a mixture of short answers and structured data responses.

 

Paper 2: Directed Writing and Composition

Duration:
1 hour 30 minutes

Weight:
50%

Details:
Candidates answer four questions based on a case study, provided as an insert with the paper.

 

Economics


Brief Description of the Course

This syllabus encourages learners to develop lifelong skills, including developing an understanding of economic theory, terminology and principles. Students will gain the ability to apply the tools of economic analysis, and distinguish between facts and value judgements in economic issues.

They will gain an understanding of, and an ability to use, basic economic numeracy and literacy, while developing the ability to take a greater part in decision-making processes in everyday life. Learners will gain an understanding of the economies of developed and developing nations and gain an excellent foundation for advanced study in economics.

Aims of the Programme

The aims of the syllabus are to:

  • develop candidates’ knowledge and understanding of economic terminology, principles and theories;
  • develop candidates’ basic economic numeracy and literacy and their ability to handle simple data including graphs and diagrams;
  • develop candidates’ ability to use the tools of economic analysis in particular situations;
  • show candidates how to identify and discriminate between differing sources of information and how to
  • distinguish between facts and value judgments in economic issues;
  • develop candidates’ ability to use economic skills (with reference to individuals, groups and organizations) to understand better the world in which they live;
  • develop candidates’ understanding of the economies of developed and developing nations and of the relationships between them; and to develop their appreciation of these relationships from the perspective of both developed and developing nations.
Assessment Objectives
  • Knowledge with understanding Students should be able to:
  • show knowledge and understanding of economic facts, definitions, concepts, principles and theories;
  • use economic vocabulary and terminology.
Analysis

Students should be able to:

  • select, organise and interpret data;
  • apply economic knowledge and understanding in written, numerical, diagrammatic and graphical form;
  • use economic data, to recognise patterns in such data, and to deduce relationships.

Critical evaluation and decision- making Students should be able to:

  • distinguish between evidence and opinion, make reasoned judgments and communicate those judgments in an accurate and logical manner;
  • recognise that economic theory has various limits and uncertainties;
  • evaluate the social and environmental implications of particular courses of economic action;
  • draw conclusions from economic information and critically evaluate economic data;
  • communicate conclusions in a logical and clear manner.
Topics Studied
  • Basic economic problem;
  • The allocation of resources;
  • Microeconomic decision makers;
  • Government and the macroeconomy;
  • Role of government in an economy.
  • Economic development;
  • International trade and globalization.
Scheme of Assessment

Examinations:

Paper 1: Multiple Choice

Duration:
45 minutes

Weight:
30%

Details:
Candidates answer 30 multiple choice questions

 

Paper 2: Extended Answer

Duration:
2 hour 15 minutes

Weight:
70%

Details:
Candidates answer one compulsory question, which requires them to interpret and analyze previously unseen data relevant to a real economic situation, and three optional questions from a choice of four.

Global Perspectives


Brief Description of The Course

This syllabus provides opportunities for enquiry into, and reflection on, key global issues from a personal, local/national and global perspective. Young people globally face unprecedented challenges in an interconnected and information-heavy world, not least in how they will gain a sense of their own active place in the world and cope with changes that will impact on their life chances and life choices. Students will explore stimulating topics that have global significance. They will assess information critically and explore lines of reasoning.  They will learn to collaborate with others from another culture, community or country, directing much of their own learning and developing an independence of thought.

Aims of the Programme

To develop learners who:

  • become independent and empowered to take their place in an ever-changing, information-heavy, interconnected world;
  • develop an analytical, evaluative grasp of global issues and their causes, consequences and possible courses of action;
  • enquire into, and reflect on, issues independently and in collaboration with others from different cultural perspectives;
  • work independently as well as part of a team, directing much of their own learning with the teacher as an active facilitator;
  • consider important issues from personal, local and/or national and global perspectives and understand the links between these;
  • critically assess the information available to them and support judgements with lines of reasoning;
  • communicate and empathise with the needs and rights of others.
Assessment Objectives

Research, analysis and evaluation :

  • Design and carry out research into current global issues, their causes, consequences and possible course(s) of action.
  • Use evidence to support claims, arguments and perspectives.
  • Identify and analyse issues, arguments and perspectives.
  • Analyse and evaluate the evidence and reasoning used to support claims, arguments and perspectives.
  • Analyse and evaluate sources and/or processes to support research, arguments, perspectives and an outcome.
  • Develop a line of reasoning to support an argument, a perspective, course(s) of action or outcome.
Reflection
  • Consider different perspectives objectively and with empathy.
  • Justify personal perspective(s) using evidence and reasoning.
  • Consider how research, engagement with different perspectives and working as part of a team, have influenced personal learning.
Communication and collaboration
  • Select and present relevant arguments, evidence and perspectives clearly and with structure.
  • Present research, and include citations and references.
  • Contribute to the shared purpose and outcome of the Team Project.
Topics Studied
  • For the Written Examination
  • Demographic change
  • Education for all
  • Employment
  • Fuel and energy
  • Globalisation
  • Law and criminality
  • Migration
  • Transport systems For the Individual Report
  • Belief systems
  • Biodiversity and ecosystem loss
  • Changing communities
  • Digital world
  • Family
  • Humans and other species
  • Sustainable living
  • Trade and aid For the Team Project
  • Conflict and peace
  • Disease and health
  • Human rights
  • Language and communication
  • Poverty and inequality
  • Sport and recreation
  • Tradition, culture and identity
  • Water, food and agriculture
Scheme of Assessment

Examination:

Written Paper

Duration:
1 hour 15 minutes

Weight:
35%

Details:
Candidates answer four compulsory questions based on source material.

Coursework:

Individual Report

Requirements:
1500–2000 words and written in continuous prose.
The title is devised by candidates themselves.

Weight:
30%

Details:
Candidates research one topic area (from a choice of eight) of personal, local and/or national and global significance and submit one report based on their research.
Internally set and Externally Marked by CAIE

Team Project

Requirements:
Team Element: The Outcome and Explanation (200–300 words)
Individual Element: Reflective Paper (750-1000 words)

Weight:
35% Total
5% Team Outcome and Explanation
30% Candidates Reflective Paper

Details:
The Outcome and Explanation will be taken together and will be assessed on the basis of the team’s effectiveness in communicating their research into different cultural perspectives in an attempt to meet the project aim.
The Candidates Reflective Paper is a analysis of there own performance and that of the team in meeting the project aim.
Internally assessed and Externally Moderated by CAIE

 

History


Brief Description of the Course

History is the study of the past. Learners will explore 20th century history from a diversity of perspectives, including social, economical, cultural and political. Learners are encouraged to raise questions, and to develop and deploy historical skills, knowledge and understanding in order to provide historical explanations.

Learners are given the opportunity to develop an interest in and enthusiasm for learning about and understanding the past, while exploring historical concepts such as cause and consequence, change and continuity, and similarity and difference. They will learn to appreciate historical evidence and how to use it, and gain a greater understanding of international issues and inter-relationships.

They will also learn how to present clear, logical arguments.

Aims of the Programme

are to:

  • stimulate interest in and enthusiasm about the past;
  • promote the acquisition of knowledge and understanding of human activity in the past;
  • ensure that the candidates’ knowledge is rooted in an understanding of the nature and use of historical evidence;
  • promote an understanding of the nature of cause and consequence, continuity and change, and similarity and difference;
  • provide a sound basis for
History

further study and the pursuit of personal interest ;

  • encourage international understanding;
  • encourage the development of linguistic and communication skills.
Assessment Objectives

The students will demonstrate the following:

  • An ability to recall, select, organise and deploy knowledge of the syllabus content.
  • An ability to construct historical explanations using an understanding of:
  • cause and consequence, change and continuity, similarity and difference;
  • the motives, emotions, intentions and beliefs of people in the past.
  • An ability to understand, interpret, evaluate and use a range of sources as evidence, in their historical context.
Topics Studied

The Core Content of Grade 9 focuses on seven Key Questions:

  • Were the peace treaties of 1919–23 fair?
  • To what extent was the League of Nations a success?
  • Why had international peace collapsed by 1939?
  • Who was to blame for the Cold War?
  • How effectively did the USA contain the spread of Communism?
  • How secure was the USSR’s control over Eastern Europe, 1948–c.1989?
  • Why did events in the Gulf matter, c. 1970-2000?

The Depth Study of Southern Africa (c.1940-c.1994) in Grade 10 focuses on:

  • What were the foundations of the Apartheid state?
  • How successfully was Apartheid established between 1948 and 1966?
  • To what extent did South Africa change between 1966-1980?
  • Why did white minority rule come to an end?
Scheme of Assessment

Examinations:

Paper 1:

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
40%

Details:
Candidates answer 2 questions on the core content and one question from the depth study.

 

Paper 2:

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
33%

Details:
Candidates answer a series of questions on one prescribed subject, with a range of source material covering the topic.

 

Coursework:

Individual Report

Requirements:
2000 words

Weight:
27%

Details:
Students produce one piece of coursework based on the depth study (Southern Africa) Internally assessed and externally moderated by CAIE.

Special Requirements for this Course

For EAL learners, a simple word-to-word translating dictionary in their mother tongue to English is necessary for exams.

Travel and Tourism


Cambridge IGCSE Travel and Tourism is designed to help meet the need for skilled and knowledgeable individuals in this rapidly diversifying industry.

The intention of the syllabus is to provide a broad introduction to the travel and tourism industry and related ancillary service industries.

The syllabus develops practical skills across a range of working roles, as well as providing a global and local perspective on travel and tourism. Students gain an overview of the industry, and learn about popular destinations, customer care, working procedures, travel and tourism products and services, and marketing and promotion.

Through their studies, students will gain an understanding of the concepts, models and theories used within the industry, and also enhance their skills of investigation, analysis, interpretation and evaluation.

Aims of the Programme

The aims of the Travel and Tourism syllabus are to provide candidates with:

  • an understanding of the travel and tourism industry;
  • a theoretical knowledge of the industry and related sectors, including knowledge of travel and tourism products and services, the infrastructure on which they depend and the transport system needed to operate them;
  • practical abilities in a range of skills and procedures related to working in the travel and tourism industry, including knowledge of the essential personal and professional skills required by individuals working in the service sector;
  • critical awareness of the physical, social and economic environments in which travel and tourism takes place, including understanding of the global, regional and local perspectives of travel and tourism.

The syllabus develops a clear understanding of the relationship between the theory and practice of working in travel and tourism.

Candidates are encouraged to develop an understanding of tourist industry operations and problems, and competence in identifying procedures and solutions, by using best practice from industry, established business techniques and information systems.

Through investigation, candidates apply their knowledge and skills in a detailed study of a particular aspect of the travel and tourism industry.

Assessment Objectives

Candidates should be able to:

  • recall, select and present relevant factual information;
  • demonstrate and apply knowledge with understanding of the correct use of the following in the travel and tourism industry:
  • commonplace terms, definitions and facts;
  • major concepts, models, patterns, principles and theories;
  • collect evidence from both primary and secondary sources, under guidance or independently, and be aware of the limitations of the various collection methods;
  • record, classify and organise relevant evidence from an investigation in a clear and coherent form;
  • present the evidence in an appropriate form and effective manner, using a wide range of appropriate skills and techniques, including verbal, numerical, diagrammatic, cartographic, pictorial and graphical methods;
  • apply knowledge and understanding to select relevant data, recognise patterns and analyse evidence;
  • communicate their ideas and opinions in an accurate, concise and logical manner;
  • present reasoned explanations for phenomena, patterns and relationships;
  • understand the implications of, and draw inferences from, data

    and evidence;

Topics Studied
  • discuss and evaluate choices, and make reasoned decisions, recommendations and judgements;
  • draw valid conclusions by a reasoned consideration of evidence.

 

 

 

  • The travel and tourism industry
  • Features of worldwide destinations
  • Customer care and working procedures
  • Travel and tourism products and services
  • Marketing and promotion
  • The marketing and promotion of visitor services
Scheme of Assessment

Candidates complete Paper 1 and either Paper 2 OR Coursework.

Examinations:

Paper 1: Short-answer

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
60%

Details:
Candidates answer 4 scenario-based questions set in an international travel and tourism environment, some provision is made for candidates to refer to local examples.

 

Paper 2: Alternative to Coursework

Duration:
2 hours 30 minutes

Weight:
40%

Details:
Candidates answer a series of questions on one prescribed subject, with a range of source material covering the topic.  It is based primarily on the contents of Unit 5.

 

Coursework:

Investigation

Requirements:
3000 words maximum

Weight:
40%

Details:
Students complete an investigation which is directed towards the content in Unit 6, and should allow candidates to apply their knowledge and skills of this area of the travel and tourism industry.
Internally assessed and externally moderated by CAIE.

 

Coordinated Sciences


Brief Description of the Course

This syllabus gives learners the opportunity to study biology, chemistry and physics within a scientifically coherent syllabus. It also enables learners to better understand the technological world, with an informed interest in scientific matters. Students learn to recognise the usefulness (and limitations) of scientific method, and how to apply this to other disciplines and in everyday life. They will develop relevant attitudes, such as a concern for

accuracy and precision, objectivity, integrity, enquiry, initiative and inventiveness. In addition, students will develop an interest in, and care for, the environment, while better understanding the influence and limitations placed on scientific study by society, economy, technology, ethics, the community and the environment. Finally, learners will develop an understanding of the scientific skills essential for both further study and everyday life.

Aims of the Programme

Students will develop skills such as accuracy, objectivity, integrity, enquiry and initiative and come to realise the usefulness and limitations of scientific method and its application to other disciplines and everyday life.

Through laboratory experiments and theoretical lessons they will understand the language of science and become aware of how 

have developed and influenced the individual, community and the environment.

Assessment Objectives

Knowledge and understanding: students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in relation to:

  • scientific phenomena, facts, laws, definitions, concepts and theories;
  • scientific vocabulary, terminology and conventions (including symbols, quantities and units);
  • scientific instruments and apparatus, including techniques of operation and aspects of safety;
  • scientific quantities and their determination;
  • scientific and technological applications with their social, economic and environmental implications.

Handling information and problem solving: students should be able, in words or using other written forms of presentation (i.e. symbolic, graphical and numerical), to:

  • locate, select, organise and present information from a variety of sources;
  • translate information from one form to another;
  • manipulate numerical and other data;
  • use information to identify patterns, report trends and draw inferences;
  • present reasoned explanations for phenomena, patterns and relationships;
  • make predictions and hypotheses;
  • solve problems, including some of a quantitative nature.

Experimental skills and investigation: students should be able to:

  • know how to use techniques, apparatus and materials (including following a sequence of instructions where appropriate);
  • plan experiments and investigations;
  • make and record observations, measurements and estimates;
  • interpret and evaluate experimental observations and data;
  • evaluate methods and suggest possible improvements (including the selection of techniques, apparatus and materials).
Topics Studied
Biology
  • Characteristics of living organisms
  • Cells
  • Biological molecules
  • Enzymes
  • Plant nutrition
  • Animal nutrition
  • Transport
  • Gas exchange and respiration
  • Coordination and response
  • Reproduction
  • Inheritance
  • Organisms and their environment
  • Human influences on ecosystems
Chemistry
  • The particulate nature of matter
  • Experimental techniques
  • Atoms, elements and compounds
  • Stoichiometry
  • Electricity and chemistry
  • Energy changes in chemical reactions
  • Chemical reactions
  • Acids, bases and salts
  • The Periodic Table
  • Metals
  • Air and water
  • Sulfur
  • Carbonates
  • Organic chemistry
Physics
  • Motion
  • Work, energy and power
  • Thermal physics
  • Properties of waves, including light and sound
  • Electricity and magnetism
  • Electrical circuits
  • Electromagnetic effects
  • Atomic physics
Scheme of Assessment

All candidates enter 3 papers.
Candidates who have studied the Core syllabus content should be entered for Paper 1, Paper 3 and Paper 5 OR Paper 6. These candidates are eligible for maximun grade C.

Candidates who have studied the Extended syllabus content should be entered for Paper 2, Paper 4 and Paper 5 OR Paper 6.

Core Candidates take:

Paper 1 Multiple-choice (CORE)

Duration:
45 minutes

Weight:
30%

Details:
Candidates complete a multiple-choice paper consisting of 40 items of the four-choice type based on the Core curriculum
NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

Paper 3: Short-answer (CORE)

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
50%

Details:
Candidates short-answer and structured questions based on the Core curriculum.
NB: Candidates that examined on the “CORE” only can earn a maximum Grade of C.

 

Extended Candidates take:

Paper 2 Multiple-choice (EXTENDED)

Duration:
45 minutes

Weight:
30%

Details:
Candidates complete a multiple-choice paper consisting of 40 items of the four-choice type based on the Extended curriculum

 

Paper 4: Short-answer (EXTENDED)

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
50%

Details:
Candidates short-answer and structured questions based on the Extended curriculum.

All Candidates take either:

 Paper 5: Practical Test

Duration:
2 hours

Weight:
20%

Details:
Candidates complete a practical test and answer questions based on experimental and observational skills.

 

Paper 6: Alternative to Practical

Duration:
1 hour 30 minutes

Weight:
20%

Details:
Candidates complete a written paper based on experimental and observational skills

 

Art & Design


Brief Description of the Course

This syllabus aims to encourage the development of experience and skills in developing and producing a range of artefacts and designs showing visual knowledge and understanding along with critical and cultural awareness. It encourages a range of skills, stimulates aesthetic awareness, knowledge and critical understanding of art, and provides opportunities for learners to develop a range of skills. Crucially, a personal and independent perspective is encouraged at all times. Successful candidates gain lifelong skills, including: confidence and enthusiasm as they develop technical skills in

two- and three-dimensional form and composition; the ability to identify and solve problems in visual and tactile forms; the ability to develop ideas from initial attempts to outcomes.

Aims of the Programme

The course encourages students to develop:

  • an ability to record from direct observation and personal experience;
  • an ability to identify and solve problems in visual and/or other forms;
  • creativity, visual awareness, critical and cultural understanding;
  • an imaginative, creative and personal response;
  • confidence, enthusiasm and a sense of achievement in the practice of art and design;
  • growing independence in the refinement and development of ideas and personal outcomes;
  • engagement and experimentation with a range of media, materials and techniques including new media where appropriate;
  • experience of working in relevant frameworks and exploration of manipulative skills necessary to form, compose and communicate in two and/ or three dimensions;
  • knowledge of a working vocabulary relevant to the subject and an interest in, and a critical awareness of other practitioners, environments and cultures;
  • investigative, analytical, experimental, interpretative, practical, technical and expressive skills, which aid effective and independent learning.
Assessment Objectives

Gathering, recording, research and investigation (20%)

  • Investigate and research a variety of appropriate sources.
  • Record and analyse information from direct observation and/or other sources and personal experience.

Exploration and development of ideas (20%)

  • Explore a range of visual and/or other ideas by manipulating images.
  • Show a development of ideas through appropriate processes.

Organisation and relationships of visual and/ or other forms (20%)

  • Organise and use the visual and/or other forms effectively to express ideas.
  • Make informed aesthetic judgements by recognising the effect of relationships between visual and/or other forms.
Topics Studied

Selection and control of materials, media and processes (20%)

  • Show exploration and experimentation with appropriate materials.
  • Select and control appropriate media and processes, demonstrating practical, technical and expressive skills and intentions.

Personal vision and presentation (20%)

  • Show personal vision and commitment through an interpretative and creative response.
  • Present an informed response through personal evaluation, reflection and critical thinking.

Painting and Related Media

  •  Landscapes,
  • Figure studies,
  • Portraits,
  • The natural or man-made environment,
  • Still-life,
  • Artefacts,
  • Abstract notions or feelings,
  • Personal experiences, Or visual ideas inspired by literary sources.

Depending on availability Graphic Design may also be offered.

Candidates should learn to use a sketchbook to make visual and/or other appropriate researches and develop their ideas. They should also show knowledge of art and design from other cultures or history and relate it to their own studies.

Scheme of Assessment

Component 1 Coursework:

Requirements:
Candidates submit a portfolio and a final outcome

Weight:
50%

Details:
The portfolio should contain work which shows the research, exploration, development and evaluation relevant to the final outcome. The portfolio can be up to four sheets of A2. Candidates may use both sides of the paper.
The final outcome should be a resolved piece of work that demonstrates breadth and depth of exploration and inquiry and it must be the candidate’s individual response.

 

Component 2: Externally Set Assignment

Duration:
8 hours

Weight:
50%

Details:
There are two parts to this component: supporting studies created during the preparation period and a final outcome, produced during a supervised test of 8 hours’ total duration.

Music


Brief Description of the Course

This syllabus offers students the opportunity to develop their own practical musical skills through performing and composing.

They also develop their listening skills by studying music from the main historical periods and styles of Western music as well as from selected non-Western traditions. The emphasis within the syllabus is as much on developing lifelong musical skills as on acquiring knowledge.  Learners are given the opportunity to: listen to and learn about music from a wide range of historical periods and major world cultures; develop their skills in performing music, both individually and in a group with other musicians; develop their skills in composing music in a style of their own choice.

Aims of the Programme

are to:

  • enable candidates to acquire and consolidate a range of basic musical skills, knowledge and understanding, through the activities of listening, performing and composing;
  • help candidates develop a perceptive, sensitive and critical response to the main historical periods and styles of Western music;
  • help candidates to recognise and understand the music of various non-Western traditions, and thus to form an appreciation of cultural similarities and differences;
  • provide a foundation for the development of an informed appreciation of music;
  • provide a foundation for further study in music at a higher level.
Recommended Prior Learning

Candidates beginning this course are expected to have a minimum of some background in practical music-making. For information on levels of proficiency required and or musical instruments available, contact the Music Teacher.

Assessment Objectives

The three assessment objectives are:

  • Listening
  • Performing
  • Composing

The examination covers the following areas:

Listening:

  • Aural awareness, perception and discrimination in relation to Western music.
  • Identifying and commenting on a range of music from cultures in different countries.
  • Knowledge and understanding of one World Focus from a non-Western culture and one Western Set Work.

Performing:

  • Technical competence on one or more instruments.
  • Interpretative understanding of the music performed.

Composing:

  • Discrimination and imagination in free composition.
  • Notation, using staff notation and, if appropriate, other suitable systems.
Scheme of Assessment

Examination

Component 1: Listening

Duration:
1 hour 15 minutes

Weight:
40%

Details:
Written examination based on CD recordings supplied by Cambridge

 

Coursework:

Component 2: Performing

Weight:
30%

Details:
Candidates complete two prepared performances, one individual and one ensemble.
Internally assessed and externally moderated by CAIE

 

Component 3: Composing

Weight:
30%

Details:
Candidates complete two contrasting compositions
Internally assessed and externally moderated by CAIE

 

Drama


Brief Description of the Course

Through practical and theoretical study, students are encouraged to understand and enjoy drama by developing their performance skills, both individually and in groups.

They develop an understanding the role of actor, director and designer in creating a piece of theatre and learn to consider ways in which ideas and feelings can be communicated to an audience.

They also discover the performance possibilities of plays and other dramatic stimuli, while devising dramatic material of their own.

Aims of the Programme

The syllabus aims to:

  • develop candidates’ understanding of drama through practical and theoretical study;
  • enable candidates to understand the role of actor, director and designer in creating a piece of theatre;
  • develop candidates’ acting skills, both individually and in groups;
  • enable candidates to develop their skills in devising original drama;
  • help candidates communicate feelings and ideas to an audience;
  • foster understanding of the performance process and enable candidates to evaluate the various stages of that process;
  • encourage enjoyment of drama;
Topics Studied

Understanding repertoire, and how to interpret and realise it in a live performance.

  • Devising dramatic material and reflecting on its effectiveness.
  • Acting skills and ability to communicate effectively to an audience.
Assessment Objectives

Candidates will be assessed on:

  • their ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the possibilities of repertoire, and how to interpret and realise it in a live performance;
  • their ability to devise dramatic material and reflect on its effectiveness;
  • their acting skills and their ability to communicate effectively to an audience.
Scheme of Assessment

Examination

Paper 1

Duration:
2 hour 30 minutes

Weight:
40%

Details:
Candidates answer all questions in Section A and choose one question from Section B and one question from Section C.

 

 

Coursework:

Component 2:

Weight:
60%

Details:

Candidates submit: one individual performance based on an extract from a play; one group performance based on an extract from a play; and one group performance based on an original devised piece.