Diploma Handbook 2020

Grade 11 & 12 | Final Examinations: 2020

Table of Contents

  1. School Mission
  2. School Vision
  3. School Philosophy
  4. School Objectives
  5. Message from the Director
  6. ISH Student Outcomes Secondary School
  7. Introduction
  8. Internal Grading and Reporting of Student Achievement
  9. Promotion from Grade11 to Grade12 and Graduation
  10. Equipment List for Secondary School Students
  11. Academic Honesty & Dishonesty
  12. Learning Support
  13. Who Can Help You?
  14. Literature
  15. Language & Literature
  16. Language “B”
  17. Language Ab Initio
  18. History
  19. Business & Management
  20. Economics
  21. Psychology
  22. Biology
  23. Chemistry
  24. Physics
  25. Environmental Systems and Societies
  26. Mathematics
  27. Visual Arts
  28. ToK: Theory of Knowledge
  29. Extended Essay
  30. CAS: Community, Action Service
  31. Physical Education

 

At the International School of Havana we want to encourage, foster and develop students with these characteristics:

 

OUR MISSION


Learning to Make a Difference

THE VISION


 

At the International School of Havana we focus together on our core work of learning, creating a powerful, positive learning culture framed by a common learning language and shared principles. We discover how to learn and how to help others learn.

Acknowledging that everyone is different, we not only embrace and celebrate our differences, but also learn from our diversity. Every member of our community has something to offer that can make a difference, to ourselves, to each other, to our community and, ultimately, to the shared world beyond our school. At the International School of Havana we all learn with a common purpose. We learn to make a difference!

SCHOOL PHILOSOPHY


The philosophy of the school is to create and provide a stimulating, happy, safe, secure and disciplined learning environment that is non-discriminatory as to ethnic origin, gender or religious belief within which students are encouraged to take intellectual risks without being at risk physically.

The school seeks to promote academic excellence by providing the best possible learning environment within an appropriately regulated community that contributes to and abides by its own rules.

The School offers a programme of study principally through the medium of the English language, while also recognising that Spanish and other languages are an important aspect of a student’s experience.

The School seeks to encourage every child to reach full potential by instilling a commitment to lifelong learning, providing a programme of learning support for those that need it and developing international mindedness and global citizenship.

The School further endeavours to foster respect for the different cultures, including that of the host country, which make up both the School and the wider community.

SCHOOL OBJECTIVES


To nurture the whole child within the academic curriculum and through Extra Curricular activities by addressing the emotional, moral, physical, intellectual, social, creative and cultural needs of the students.

To maximise the skills of learning in all students, including those with Special Educational Needs, in order to provide learning experiences enabling students to meet, or preferably exceed, the benchmark learning outcomes and attainment levels set by our curriculum.

To enhance the skills of teaching for all members of the academic staff through an ongoing programme of professional development based on sound, modern educational theory.

To actively encourage parents to become and remain involved in the education of their children through regular reporting of student progress, programmed parent-teacher consultations and the development of home-school collaborative strategies to maximise student achievement.

To promote a sense of care and responsibility in each child, for the School, host country and larger global ecological and educational environment through field- trips, projects, exchanges and other activities within the curriculum.

 Message from the Director


Welcome to the International School of Havana!

For some, this will be a return to ISH and for others, you will be joining the community for the first time. For all, I hope that this school year will be a most fulfilling experience for students, families and our entire community.

At the International School of Havana we focus together on our core work of creating a powerful, positive learning culture framed by a common language and shared principles. We discover how to learn and how to help others learn.

Acknowledging that everyone is different, we embrace and celebrate our differences, and learn from our diversity. Every member of our community has something to offer that can make a difference, to ourselves, to each other, to our community and, ultimately, to the shared world beyond our school. At the International School of Havana we all learn with a common purpose. We learn to make a difference!

This handbook is a guide for both students and parents to help you understand our educational goals as well as the expectations the school has for you as essential partners in learning. With a fundamental commitment to student-centred education, ISH offers a full and varied curricular and extra-curricular program, designed to provide a rigorous journey of learning for each and every student.

We recognize and value the individual talents, interests and innate sense of curiosity in each of us.  Our aim is to provide a challenging and supportive environment within which students will flourish.

It is my sincere belief that there is no more noble and important a profession than education. In this dynamic and often challenging global environment, we are called upon to foster the continual development of young people to become the leaders and caretakers of our planet; and in so doing, make it a better, more peaceful and sustainable place to live and thrive. This is a foundational purpose of teaching and all those who support it.

One of my favourite proverbs, originating from Nigeria, says, “It takes a whole village to raise a child.” I believe this fundamentally and hope to help contribute to the development of a caring and collaborative village, all of whose members join together in raising our children.  As such, it is our expectation that all parents will partner with the school and contribute positively towards our community of learners.

Within these pages, you will find much of what the school does and how we do it. Over the course of the year, through communications with teachers, administrators and other school personnel, we expect your essential learning about the school to be enhanced further. The quality of that learning, however, will depend largely on you and the level of engagement you invest in your learning about the school and its multiple offerings. Although this handbook covers a broad scope, its contents are not exhaustive and may over time, be revised.  When that happens, the school will communicate important happenings and changes in order to keep you informed.

On behalf of our faculty and staff, I welcome you and your child to our ‘village’ – whether returning or new to the school – and hope that each of you has a rewarding and enriching year ahead at the International School of Havana.

In partnership, Michael Lees Director

International School of Havana

ISH Student Outcomes Secondary School


At the end of the Secondary School experience an ideal ISH student will be:

an effective communicator who:
  • can read,  write, speak and listen effectively;
  • can enquire, search for, find, use and present information;
  • can talk about his/her feelings and empathise with the feelings of others.
a higher level thinker and learner who:
  • accepts and thinks about new and different ideas;
  • is able to apply what he/she knows to the real world;
  • plans and arranges his/her work and time well;
  • thinks about problems and creates solutions by identifying different approaches and deciding which one(s) to use;
  • is able to work alone or as part of a group or team;
  •  is proficient in the use of ICT;
  • reflects upon what he/she has learned;
  • asks and answers the, “what if” questions raised by his/her studies;
  • uses all the available opportunities to learn wisely ;
  • takes responsibility for the quality of his/her work;
  • uses opportunities to learn more profoundly in areas that interest him/her;
  • is able to learn from and support the learning of his/her classmates;
  • is able to understand big ideas and see a big picture in his/her learning;
  • adopts the attitudes of a lifelong learner.
a responsible and contributory citizen within the ISH multi-cultural society who:
  • is self disciplined and obeys the school and class rules;
  • is honest in his/her behaviour and work;
  • can address his/her own needs for physical, mental and emotional health;
  • understands, values and respects who he/she is and who others are in our society;
  • respects everyone’s needs, ideas and beliefs ;
  • acts in a way that is safe for him/herself and others;
  • understands different cultures, including his/her own, through art, music, literature and drama;
  • participates actively in all aspects of school life;
  • understands the need to protect the environment and acts accordingly;
  • understands and acts as a member of the global society.

Introduction


This handbook should contain all the information you need to be fully aware of the nature of the Diploma Programmes that are offered at IShavana for Grade 11 and Grade 12.

The General Information section contains the requirements for admission along with an overview of the curriculum.

The grading system for this part of our school curriculum is explained, and advice on who you can consult is given if you have any questions that are not addressed within this handbook.
Finally, there are course outlines for each of the courses that are on offer within the programmes.

The ISH & IB Diplomas: A Framework for Success

In Grade 11 and Grade 12, IShavana provides various pathways to graduation that can be tailored to individual needs of each student. The ISH Diploma Programme runs parallel with the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. This allows flexibility for students with different aims, abilities and educational experiences. Students may follow the the Full IBDP or the ISHDP OR a combination of Both. Both programmes build on the skills and knowledge students gained in the IGCSE programme, (Grade 9 & Grade 10) to provide for both internally promoted students and those that enroll in Grade 11 from elsewhere.

Enrolment in and selection of a Programme of study

The ISH Diploma Programme is available to all students whose enrolment is accepted in Grade 11 or Grade 12: the programme aims to provide appropriate opportunities for students across the whole normal ability range and from various academic backgrounds with varied aptitudes and experiences. Students in Grade 11 and Grade 12 may elect to undertake studies which are assessed internally within the ISHDP, or externally assessed by the IB, or a combination of both.

Regardless of the path to graduation chosen, students learn more than a body of knowledge. The Diploma Programmes prepares students for university and encourages them to:

  • ask challenging questions;
  • learn how to learn;
  • develop a strong sense of their own identity and culture;
  • develop the ability to communicate with and understand people from other countries and cultures.
The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

(IBDP) is a challenging and rigorous twoyear curriculum, primarily aimed at students aged 16 to 19 who are highly motivated academically.

The Diploma is recognised around the world as the premier university matriculation qualification available to students at international schools.

IB Diploma Programme – requirements for admission

Entry into the IB Diploma Programme is not automatic and will be determined by the school’s evaluation of each prospective candidate’s suitability for admission.

Factors that will influence the decision are the important attributes critical to the success of students in the IB Diploma Programme:

Internal candidates promoted from Grade 10:

  • Proven academic performance and results of the IGCSE examinations.
  • The candidate’s desire to undertake rigorous academic studies.
  • Demonstrable evidence of a strong work ethic.
  •  A mature attitude towards work, recreation and school life.

Candidates who have completed Grade 10 in other schools:

Proven academic performance and results of either the IGCSE examinations, if applicable, or an alternative programme.

  • The candidate’s desire to undertake rigorous academic studies.
  • Demonstrable evidence of a strong work ethic.
  • A mature attitude towards work, recreation and school life.

Similarly, once admitted to the IB Diploma Programme, studentsmmust apply to study subjects at Higher Level. The school will evaluate all such applications, and reserves the right of approval for students to undertake Higher Level courses of study.

The school will also consider academic performance and the student’s well being at key points throughout the IB Diploma Programme to determine if progress reports and assessment results indicate that it is appropriate to withdraw him or her from the IB Diploma Programme and transfer to the ISH Diploma Programme.

At the end of Grade 12, those students who successfully fulfil the externally and internally assessed requirements of the Programme will be awarded the International Baccalaureate Diploma.

The ISH Diploma Programme

All students whose enrolment is accepted by the school in Grade 11 and Grade 12 automatically enter the ISH Diploma Programme. Students not enrolled in IB courses undertake studies offered within our internal programme. These run parallel to subjects in the IBDP and are based on Modified IB Standard level courses. The assessment for ISH courses is different in two important ways:

  1. all assessment is internal and based on our expectations derived from modified external standards.
  2. despite being a 2 year programme, assessments including examinations only cover learning undertaken during the reporting period in question.

Students in ISH courses also do not undertake Higher level studies in any of their subjects. Students do however under take Additional Studies in 3 subjects that aim to either enrich a subject in which they have an interest OR to offer additional support in subjects that they find challenging.

Is there a Choice of Subjects in the Programme?

All students must follow the additional course of Physical Education offered for the ISH Diploma in Grades 11 and 12 in addition to those in Groups 1 to 6 below.

Students must select two language subjects: either 2 different languages in G1 or 1 from Groups 1 and 2 combined. They also need to select one subject from each Group 3 to Group 6 below. For students undertaking the full IBDP, Three of the subjects need to be at Higher Level, HL, and three as Standard Level, SL.

  • Thus:
    English is available at Language A and B, HL, SL and ISH.
  • Spanish and French are available at language A and B, HL, SL and ISH , and Language Ab initio SL and ISH, if enough uptake is guaranteed.
  • Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Economics, Business Management, History, Psychology and Visual Arts are available at HL, SL and ISH.
  • Mathematics is available at various levels for both IB and ISH students.
  • All subjects except for Spanish and French are taught through the medium of the English
    language.

Note that in addition it may be possible for students to elect to enter IBDP examinations as selftaught candidates in, for example, their mother tongue.

Group 1
Studies in Language &
Literature
  • Literature English and Spanish
  • Language and Literature English and French
Group 2
Language Acquistion
  • English B
  • Spanish B
  • Spanish Ab initio (SL and ISH
    only)
  •  French B (If uptake is guaranteed)
  • French Ab initio (SL and ISH only and only if uptake is guaranteed)
Group 3
Individuals & Societies
  • Economics
  • History
  • Psychology
Group 4
Experimental Sciences
  • Biology
  • Physics
  • Environmental Systems and Societies (SL and ISH only)
Group 5
Mathematics
  • Mathematical Studies (SL and ISH Only)
  • Mathematics
Group 6
The Arts & Other
Subjects
  • Visual Arts
  • Chemistry
  • Business Management
Additional IBDP
Requirements
  • CAS, Creativity Activity Service
  • ToK, Theory of Knowledge
  • EE, an Extended Essay
Additional ISH
Requirements
  • Physical Education

 

Internal Grading and Reporting of Student Achievement


Grading and Reporting of Student Achievement for IBDP Subjects

In addition to internal assessments and reporting, students studying IBDP subjects are also graded using externally set assessment tools and grading systems. Throughout the programme it is important that all stake holders: students, parents and teachers, can measure performance relative to these external standards. For this reason, a Grade Summary is included with each report. The expectations and grades awarded in this summary are based entirely on student work representative of International Baccalaureate standards completed up to the end of the reporting period. It is not a measure of how a student would perform if they were to complete the final assessment(s) for a given course at the time the report is issued.

Grades for subjects in Groups 1,2,3,4,5 and 6 are given on a 1 to 7 scale. Grades for ToK and the Extended Essay are given on a E to A scale with “E” being a failing condition.

Grading and Reporting of Student Achievement for ISH Subjects

In addition to internal assessments and reporting, students studying ISHDP subjects are also graded using internally set assessment tools and grading systems. These contain modified expectations and tasks derived from IB standards. Throughout the programme it is important that all stake holders: students, parents and teachers, can measure performance relative to these standards. For this reason, a Grade Summary is included with each report. The expectations and grades awarded in this summary are based entirely on student work representative of these standards completed up to the end of the reporting period. Grades for all subjects are given on a G to A scale.

Promotion from Grade11 to Grade12 and Graduation


The calculation of academic points

When calculating the number of academic points needed for promotion or graduation, IB Points are counted on a one to one basis ie, 4=4 graduation points. For Students in ISH subjects, grades are converted to points with A=7 and G=1.

ISH Diploma Grading & Promotion System

 Grade 11Grade 12
Group 177
Group 277
Group 377
Group 477
Group 577
Group 677
Final Presentation6
Total points4248
Total points at graduation90
Minimum points necessary:
For Promotion to or Graduation from Grade 122346
(over two years)
To qualify for the Principals Honour Roll (each year is calculated separately)3845

 

ISH Diploma Grading & Promotion System for students in the IBDP
 Grade 11Grade 12
Group 177
Group 277
Group 377
Group 477
Group 577
Group 677
Final Presentation Theory of Knowledge & The Extended Essay6
3
(See Matix below)
3
Total points4251
Total points at graduation93
Minimum points necessary:
For Promotion to or Graduation from Grade 122426
To qualify for the Principals Honour Roll (each year is calculated separately)3845

 

Graduating with the ISH Diploma
  • All students that fulfill the requirements of the IBDP on their final report card are automatically
    eligible to graduate with an ISH diploma provided that:
  • The requirements for PE have been met in both years.
  • The student has maintained a satisfactory attendance record throughout the programme this,is generally considered to be,90% or higher inline with our Attendance Policy.
  • The student has satisfactorily completed the end of programme presentation.

The ISH Diploma is awarded in addition to any diploma awarded by the IB.
For more information on the number of points required see the table above.

Non-Examinable Subjects

Physical Education, Theory of Knowledge and CAS are subjects without formal Mid-Year and Final Examinations. However, students must satisfy the requirements in order to graduate. The final predicted grades for ToK and the Extended Essay are combined to give a possible 3 bonus points according to the ToK and Extended Essay points matrix.

The extended essay/ theory of knowledg matrix

how show this table

Equipment List for Diploma Students


The ISH requires its students to be properly equipped to carry out all work required of them in their daily studies and homework.

It is strongly recommended that students in Diploma Programmes have a suitable Electronic device to both consume and produce digital information/work. As our global community becomes ever more reliant on these technologies it is important that our students are equipped for such a world. Very soon the school will be adopting a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) Policy and such devices will be required.

Research shows the use of electronic devices has the greatest impact when those devices are the property, of and cater to the preference of the user. For this reason we are not prescriptive regarding the type of device, provided it conforms with the following guidelines:

Hardware, Operating System and Apps (programmes) must work together and be useful.

Must be able to assess a variety of web based applications using common protocols and languages.

Must be able to connect to a 802.11 b/g/n wireless network.

Must be able to connect an external display, any connectors or adaptors required to do so must be supplied by the owner. At this time, VGA is the most common connection used in the school. A change to HDMI as hardware is upgraded over the coming
years is under way.

  •  Must have a working battery and power supply. The school has US style power outlets. Any adaptors needed must be supplied by the owner.
  • Must be able to access, save / export files to an external storage device.
  • Must have sufficient storage.
  •  It is recommended that it can also record sound and video.

A physical Keyboard is highly recommended. And meets the following Software
Requirements:

  • A word processing app that can read and save .doc and .docx.
  • A spreadsheet app that can open and save .xls and .xlsx.
  • A presentation app that can open and save .ppt and .pptx.
  • An app that can open edit and save .PDF.
  • A web browser: Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome are recommended. Windows based computers please note: Internet Explorer is not compatible with some school systems.
  • An operating system OR app that allows for the transferring of files to and from the device.
  • Student may be required to have additional subject specific software .
  • Computers with windows based operating systems must have up to date antivirus software. Owners are responsible for the installation and updates of this software.
  • A universally compatible Audio/Video player. One example of such an app is VLC.
Responsibilities
  • Parents are responsible for purchasing the device. This device remains the property of the student/family.
  • Students are solely responsible for their device. Parents must ensure that students are aware of this. This includes the operating system, applications and hardware of the device. The school will extend support for connectivity within the school.
  • Devices must be clearly labelled with the student’s name and grade.
  • Owners are responsible for updates or repairs.
  • ISH takes no responsibility for the security of studentowned technology. ISH is not responsible for lost or stolen devices, nor does ISH take any financial responsibility towards damaged or stolen devices.
  • This device is considered a tool for lessons, just as pencils and paper. As such, students are expected to bring their device to school at all times. There are an extremely limited number or devices available for short term loan in cases of emergency. If a student forgets his/her device repeatedly, consequences will be given by the Teacher/ Coordinator/ Principal.
  • If the device is not needed (eg. P.E. lessons, field trips), it must be locked in the student’s locker.
Other Required equipment:

(These items can be found in Cuba, but are not always available.)

  • Pens: Black, Blue and Red.
  • Pencils: Drawing and Design.
  • Notebooks.
  • Dictionaries: English First Language/English translating dictionary.
  • Calculators: Graphical. Calculator TI-84+ to be bought from the school.
  • Physical Education clothes, shoes and personal hygiene equipment.
  • Any other items advised that are deemed as essential by the teaching staff.
  • Drawing equipment: Set Squares & Set of Compasses & Protractor
Suggested equipment:

(These items can be found in Cuba, but are not always available.)

  • Coloured Pencils: Full range.
  • Pencil Sharpener(s): At least one.
  • Eraser(s): At least one.
  • Metric Ruler(s)
  • Glue Stick(s): At least one
  • File Ring Binders or folders for students working with them.
  • Organiser for Homework and Handouts.
The School will provide:
  • All necessary textbooks.
  • A Homework Diary.
  • A locker to store personal and school property.

Students and parents are advised that for reasons of security all items should bear the student’s name.

The School expects that all the above items will be replaced immediately if they are lost or used and will do likewise for items that are provided for students. In the case of items lost, a charge will be made for the issue of replacement items.

Academic Honesty & Dishonesty


Academic honesty occurs when a person who presents someone else’s work, acknowledges the author of the work. This can be done through footnoting the author of the ideas incorporated, or by providing a bibliography of books, websites and news articles used with clear citing in the text. It is therefore important to keep track of all sources used and the date they were accessed in case of websites or newspaper articles. It is also important to add the citing the moment a source is used, so it will not be forgotten.

Academic dishonesty (or plagiarism) is the opposite of academic honesty and occurs when other people’s work is presented as his or her own, including tutor’s work. Plagiarism is a serious offence with consequences.

There are four things all students should know about the consequences of plagiarism:

1) Academic dishonesty is a serious offence.

Teachers are expected to report all instances of plagiarism to the Principal. Students found guilty will have this entered into their record. There is never any possible circumstance where academic dishonesty can be allowed.

2) Academic dishonesty in most instances is easy to identify and expose.

The very force that makes plagiarism easy and tempting to some students–the internet–makes its detection easy. Most teachers can locate the source of suspected plagiarism within a few
minutes of searching the web. In this context, plagiarism is as much ignorance as it is dishonesty.

3) All parties involved in plagiarism are considered equally guilty.

If you share your coursework with another student and he or she plagiarizes it, you are considered as guilty as the one who has plagiarized your work, since you enabled the plagiarism to take place. Under no circumstances should a student make his or her coursework available to another student unless the teacher gives explicit permission for this to happen.

4) Suspected dishonesty is a reason not to accept student work.

Teachers know their students and therefore have a good idea of their writing style, among other things that make plagiarism detectable. This makes teachers highly qualified to judge work handed in as genuinely the student’s work or not. A teacher has the right to refuse work that is seen to be suspicious. It will be up to the students to prove that the work is solely done by him or her.

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty

Students who have been reported, investigated and determined to be in contradiction to the policy and what it stands for will face the following consequences:

First Infraction:

Mark of 0% on the work in question which may include any other established penalty or
consequence as outlined by the relevant teacher or phase level coordinator. If there is reasonable
doubt about the student having misunderstood what academic dishonesty is, he/she might be
given a chance to make up for the work and remove the 0% from the marks list.

Second Infraction:

Mark of 0% on the work in question which may include any other established penalty or consequence as outlined by the said teacher or phase level coordinator.

Student’s name will be placed on the infraction registrar and will be reported to the Principal. A meeting with parents/guardians is called to help the student to understand the consequences of his/her action.

Ensuing Infractions:

A disciplinary hearing will be held with parents/guardians, the student and selected staff
members. Normal disciplinary action can be taken including suspension and expulsion.

NOTE: Infractions should not prevent a student from being promoted if criteria for promotion have been met.

Show Academic Honesty by Citing Sources Properly

Copying someone’s work is an extreme and straightforward act of plagiarism. More commonly,
however, students plagiarize without realizing they are doing so. This generally happens when
a student fails to acknowledge the source of an idea or phrasing. While unintentional plagiarism is generally treated more leniently than intentional plagiarism, it is nonetheless a sign of sloppiness and/or failure to educate oneself about what plagiarism is.

In any specific case, if you are unsure about what is acceptable and what is not, the best thing is
to ask your teacher. In general, it is better to err on the side of over-citation than under-citation. Besides, this shows that you are serious about the material you read.

Learning Support


 Learning Support is available for those students in Grades 11 and 12 that are identified under the school’s referral system or for those students that present evidence, at admission, of a diagnosed and documented Special Educational Need.

In order to qualify for special considerations, individual cases have to be outlined in an I.E.P
(Individualized Education Plan) created by the Learning Support Department in conjunction with the I.E.P. Team and supporting documentation must be provided.

Special Considerations will be awarded on a case by case basis.

Teachers can refer students to the Learning Support Department if they have or appear to have/be:

  • Achieving below grade level expectations.
  • Achieving above grade level expectations.
  • Specific language difficulties, i.e. Reading, writing, spelling, comprehension.

Learning Support begins a process of consultation. This process can, but does not always include the following:

  • Recommendations and or support with study/homework/ organizational habits.
  • Recommendations, adjustments and or differentiation at the classroom
    level.
  • Educational assessments: (achievement, cognitive, selfesteem and behavioural).
  • Direct interventions for specific difficulties, in the Learning Support Department.
  • In class assistance through the Learning Support Department.
  • Assistance with university applications requesting special considerations.
  • Consultations to discuss options available in the postsecondary school world.
  • Consultations with teachers, students and parents. Test taking and exam preparation extracurricular classes.
  • Individual Education Plans and the process that goes along with these plans.

The purpose of learning support assistance is to ensure that student’s needs and strengths
are identified and addressed as early as possible. The aim is to give support and strategies to
the student, school and home components. The role is to provide a support network that will
allow students to become more independent learners with better skills for lifelong learning.

 

Who Can Help You?


If you need help on any aspect of the IGCSE programme please consult the relevant subject teacher or the Coordinator.

Osmery Martínez | Diploma Coordinator

How to use the rest of this Handbook

An important note for students considering internal, non IB subjects in the ISH Diploma Programme

The subject descriptions and assessment outlines that are provided in this handbook are for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme for Higher and Standard Level.

Subjects offered at ISH Diploma level are based on modified IB Standard level courses so, the information provided gives you a good idea of the nature of the subject and how you will be assessed.

As the ISH diploma is customizable, it is imperative that students ask teachers for their ISH subjects to carefully explain how the assessment and Additional Studies may be differentiated for them so that expectations and requirement are clearly understood by all stake holders.

Literature


Description of the Course

The course is built on the assumption that literature is concerned with our conceptions, interpretations and experiences of the world. The study of literature can therefore be seen
as an exploration of the way it represents the complex pursuits, anxieties, joys and fears to which human beings are exposed in the daily business of living. It enables an exploration of one of the more enduring fields of human creativity, and provides opportunities for encouraging independent, original, critical and clear thinking. It also promotes respect for the imagination and a perceptive approach to the understanding and interpretation of literary works.

Through the study of a wide range of literature, the language A: literature course encourages students to appreciate the artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and by considering a range of critical approaches. In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the language A: literature course does not limit the study of works to the products of one culture or the cultures covered by any one language. The study of works in translation is especially important in introducing students, through literature, to other cultural perspectives. The response to the study of literature is through oral and written communication, thus enabling students to develop and refine their command of language.

Language A: literature is a flexible course that allows teachers to choose works from prescribed lists of authors and to construct a course that suits the particular needs and interests of their students. It is divided into four parts, each with a particular focus.

Part 1: Works in translation
Part 2: Detailed study
Part 3: Literary genres
Part 4: Options (in which works are freely chosen)

Aims of the Programme
  • Introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles and
    genres.
  • Develop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections.
  • Develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication.
  • Encourage students to recognize the importance of the contexts in which texts are written and received.
  • Encourage, through the study of texts, an appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures, and how these perspectives construct meaning.
  • Encourage students to appreciate the formal, stylistic and aesthetic qualities of texts.
  • Promote in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, language and literature.
  • Develop in students an understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism.
  • Develop the students’ ability to form independent literary judgments and to support those ideas.
Objectives
  • There are three assessment objectives at SL and at HL for the language A: literature course.
    Knowledge and understanding.
    Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of individual literary works as representatives of
    their genre and period, and the relationships between them.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which cultural values are expressed in literature.
  • Demonstrate awareness of the significance of the context in which a work is written and
    received.
  • Substantiate and justify ideas with relevant examples.
  • Analysis, synthesis and evaluation.
  • Demonstrate an ability to analyse language, structure, technique and style, and evaluate their effects on the reader.
  • Demonstrate an ability to engage in independent literary criticism on both familiar and unfamiliar literary texts.
  • Show an ability to examine and discuss in depth the effects of literary techniques and the connections between style and meaning (HL only).
  • Selection and use of appropriate presentation and language skills.
  • Demonstrate an ability to express ideas clearly and fluently in both written and oral communication, with an effective choice of register and style.
  • Demonstrate a command of terminology and concepts appropriate to the study of literature.
  • Demonstrate an ability to express well-organized oral and written arguments.
  • Demonstrate an ability to write a sustained and detailed literary commentary (HL only).
Topics Studied 

Drama, Novels, Short stories, Poetry, Essays, Travel writing, Literary theory.

Assessment Outline
Standard Level Assessment
  External Assessment Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Written AssignmentIndividual Oral Commentary (IOC) and Individual Oral Presentation (IOP)
Time1 ½ hours1 ½ hoursThe 4 stages are ongoing throughout the course.(IOC) 10 minutes
(IOP) 10-15 minutes
Weighting20%25%25%30%
(15% + 15%)
ContentLiterary analysis of one unseen text in response to guided questions.An essay based on at least two works studied in Part 3.4 stages: (1)Interactive oral,
(2) Reflective statement,
(3) Develop topic- Supervised writing,
(4)Literary essay on a work in translation.
(IOC) The Individual oral commentary is a literary analysis of an extract taken from one of the works studied in Part 2 of the syllabus.
(IOP) The Individual oral presentation is based on a specific aspect/focus of a Part 4 work. The presentation is prepared in advance and presented to the teacher/class.

 

Higher Level Assessment

  External Assessment Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Written AssignmentIndividual Oral Commentary and Interview (IOC), Individual Oral Presentation (IOP)
ContentLiterary analysis of one unseen text.An essay based on at least two works studied in Part 3.4 stages: (1) Interactive oral,
(2) Reflective statement,
(3) Develop topic- Supervised writing,
(4) Literary essay on a work in translation.
(IOC) The Individual oral commentary is a literary analysis of a poem, or an extract from a poem, taken from Part 2 of the syllabus. An interview follows on another Part 2 work that was not used for the commentary.
(IOP) The Individual oral presentation is based on a specific aspect/focus of a Part 4 work. The presentation is prepared in advance and presented to the teacher/class.

 

Language & Literature


Description of the Course

Language A: language and literature comprises four parts— two relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. The study of the texts produced in a language is central to an active engagement with language and culture and, by extension, to how we see and understand the world in which we live. Helping students to focus closely on the language of the texts they study and to become aware of the role of each text’s wider context in shaping its meaning is central to the course. The language A: language and literature course aims to develop in students skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culturally determined reading practices. The
course is designed to be flexible— teachers have the opportunity to construct it in a way that reflects the interests and concerns that are relevant to their students while developing in students a range of transferable skills. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is affected by reading practices that are culturally defined and by the circumstances of production and reception.

Aims of the Programme
  • Introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles and genres.
  • Develop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections.
  • Develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication.
  • Encourage students to recognize the importance of the contexts in which texts are written and received.
  • Encourage, through the study of texts, an appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures, and how these perspectives construct meaning.
  • Encourage students to appreciate the formal, stylistic and aesthetic qualities of texts.
  • Promote in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, language and literature.
  • Develop in students an understanding of how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in texts.
  • Encourage students to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience and purpose.
Objectives

There are four assessment objectives at SL and at HL for the language A language and literature
course.

Knowledge and understanding.

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a range of texts.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the use of language, structure, technique and style.
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the various ways in which the reader constructs meaning and of how context influences this constructed meaning.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how different perspectives influence the reading of a text.
Application and analysis
  • Demonstrate an ability to choose a text type appropriate to the purpose required.
  • Demonstrate an ability to use terminology relevant to the various text types studied.
  • Demonstrate an ability to analyse the effects of language, structure, technique and style on the reader.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the ways in which the production and reception of texts contribute to their meanings.
  • Demonstrate an ability to substantiate and justify ideas with relevant examples.
Synthesis and evaluation
  • Demonstrate an ability to compare and contrast the formal elements, content and context of texts.
  • Discuss the different ways in which language and image may be used in a range of texts.
  • Demonstrate an ability to evaluate conflicting viewpoints within and about a text.
  • At HL only: Produce a critical response evaluating some aspects of text, context and meaning.
Selection and use of appropriate presentation and language skills
  • Demonstrate an ability to express ideas clearly and with fluency in both written and oral communication.
  • Demonstrate an ability to use the oral and written forms of the language, in a range of styles, registers and situations.
  • Demonstrate an ability to discuss and analyse texts in a focused and logical manner.
  • At HL only: Demonstrate an ability to write a balanced, comparative analysis
Assessment Outline
Standard Level Assessment
  External Assessment Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Written TasksOral Tasks
Time1 ½ hours1 ½ hoursOngoing throughout the course.(IOC) 15 minutes
(Oral Activity) 20-30 minutes
Weighting25%25%20%30%
(15% + 15%)
ContentTextual analysis The paper consists of two unseen texts.In response to one of six questions students write an essay based on both literarytexts studied in part 3. The questions are the same as the HL but the assessment criteria are different.Students produce at least three written tasks based on material studied in the course.
Students submit one written task for external assessment.
This task must be 800–1,000 words in length plus a rationale of 200–300 words.
Individual Oral Commentary (IOC):
Students comment on an extract from a literary text studied in part 4 of the course.
Students are given two guiding questions.
Further oral activity:
Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on part 1 and one based on part 2 of the course. The mark of one further oral activity is submitted for final assessment.

 

Higher Level Assessment

  External Assessment Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Written TasksOral Tasks
Time2 hours2 hoursOngoing throughout the course.(IOC) 15 minutes
(Oral Activity) 20-30 minutes
Weighting25%25%20%30%
(15% + 15%)
ContentTextual analysis The paper consists of two unseen texts.In response to one of six questions students write an essay based on at least two of the literary texts studied in part 3. The questions are the same as SL but the assessment criteria are different.Students produce at least four written tasks based on material studied in the course.
One of the tasks submitted must be a critical response to one of the prescribed questions for the HL additional study.
Each task must be 800– 1,000 words in length plus a rationale of 200-300 words.
Individual Oral Commentary (IOC):
Students comment on an extract from a literary text studied in part 4 of the course.
Students are given two guiding questions.
Further oral activity
Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on part 1 and one based on part 2 of the course. The mark of one further oral activity is submitted for final assessment.

 

Introduction


Group 2 consists of five language courses: Language B in English, Spanish and French, and Spanish and French Ab initio, accommodating the different levels of linguistic proficiency that students have. French will only be offered if enough students choose that option. There is a single set of group 2 aims, which are common to all the courses, but the assessment objectives are differentiated according to what the students are expected to be to able to demonstrate at the end of each course.

Language “B”


Description of the Course

Language B is offered in English HL & SL, in Spanish HL & SL, and if enough uptake is guaranteed also in French. Language B is an additional languagelearning course for students with some background in the target language. The main focus is on language acquisition and development of language skills. These language skills are developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts, and are related to the culture(s) concerned. The material is chosen to enable students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding.

Language B is offered to students who are not native speakers and who are challenged to reach Language A requirements. The professional staff’s opinion of what is best for the individual student’s learning needs will be the prime consideration. The IBOrganization’s required profile for a Full Bilingual Diploma Candidate will also be a factor under consideration in recommending that a student follow the Language B course as the student will need to study another language at A level.

Standard and higher levels courses are differentiated by the recommended teaching hours, the depth of syllabus coverage, the study of literature at HL, the level of difficulty and the demands of assessment and the assessment criteria.

Aims of the Programme
  • Develop students’ intercultural understanding.
  • Enable students to understand and use the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes.
  • Encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures.
  • Develop students’ awareness of the role of language in relation to other areas of knowledge.
  • Develop students’ awareness of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar.
  • Provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the useof an additional language.
  • Provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through knowledge of an additional language.
Objectives

Students will be assessed on their ability to:

  • communicate clearly and effectively in a range of situations, demonstrating linguistic competence and intercultural understanding;
  • use language appropriate to a range of interpersonal and/or cultural contexts;
  • understand and use language to express and respond to a range of ideas with accuracy and fluency;
  • organize ideas on a range of topics, in a clear, coherent and convincing manner;
  • understand, analyse and respond to a range of written and spoken texts;
  • understand and use works of literature written in the target language of study (HL only).
Topics Studied

The core is divided into three mandatory areas of study:

  • Communication and media
  • Global issues
  • Social relationships

In addition, two more options are chosen from the following:

  • Cultural diversity
  • Customs and traditions
  • Health
  • Leisure
  • Science and technology

HL students read two works of literature.

Assessment Outline
Standard Level Assessment
  External Assessment Internal Assessment 
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Written AssignmentOral CommentaryInteractive Oral
Time1.5 hours1.5 hoursIn class8-10 min
Weighting25%25%20%20%10%
ContentQuestions on four textsWritten response to one task (250–400 words)Creative writing (300-400 words) plus a 100-word rationaleIndividual presentation followed by conversation with the teacherClassroom interaction: three tasks including one listening task
Higher Level Assessment
  External Assessment Internal Assessment 
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Written AssignmentOral CommentaryInteractive Oral
Time1.5 hours1.5 hoursIn class8-10 min
Weighting25%25%20%20%10%
ContentQuestions on five textsSection A: Written response to one task (250-400 words)
Section B: Written argumentative response (150-250 words)
Creative response to literature (500-600 words) plus a 150- word rationaleIndividual presentation followed by conversation with the teacherClassroom interaction: three tasks including one listening task

Paper 1

Duration:

1.5 hours

Weight:

25%

Details:

Questions on five texts

Paper 2: External Assessment

Duration:

1.5 hours

Weight:

25%

Details:

Section A: Written response to one task (250–400 words)
Section B: Written argumentative response (150–250 words)

 

Written Assignment

Duration:

In class

Weight:

20%

Details:

Creative response to literature (500–600 words) plus a 150- word rationale

Oral Commentary: Internal Assessment

Duration:

8-10 min

Weight:

20%

Details:

Individual presentation followed by conversation with the teacher

Interactive Oral: Internal Assessment

 

Weight:

10%

Details:

Classroom interaction: three tasks including one listening task

 

Language Ab Initio

Description of the Course

Ab Initio is offered in Spanish and if enough demand also in French. Ab initio is a foreign language learning course offered to students in grades 11 and 12 who are not native speakers of the language and have limited or no experience in learning the language. The course focuses on the acquisition and development of the four language skills, listening, speaking, reading and writing, to a similar level of communicative competence.

The course focuses on everyday situations and aspects of the culture related to them. This ensures that appropriate emphasis is placed on communication. For this reason, the course has been organized into a number of topics which provide both the teacher and the students with a context in which several communicative functions (or purposes) and the different grammatical structures and vocabulary can be practiced.

Aims of the Programme
  • Enable students to understand and use the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes.
  • Enable students to use the language appropriately.
  • Encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures.
  • Develop students’ awareness of the role of language in relation to other areas of knowledge.
  • Provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through knowledge of a language Provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through language.
  • Develop students’ awareness of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar.
Objectives

The overall objective of this course is for students to achieve communicative competence in a variety of everyday situations.

At the end of the language Ab initio course candidates will be expected to demonstrate ability to:

  1. demonstrate an awareness and understanding of the intercultural elements related to the prescribed topics
  2. communicate clearly and effectively in a range of situations
  3. understand and use accurately the basic structures of the language
  4. understand and use an appropriate range of vocabulary
Assessment Outline
Standard Level Assessment

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

1.30 hour

Weight:

30%

Details:

Text Handling (Reading comprehension)

Paper 2

Duration:

1 hour

Weight:

25%

Details:

Written production

Written Assignment

Duration:

It must be carried out
in a student’s own
time with guidance
from the teacher

Weight:

20%

Details:

Written production

Internal Assessment

IndividualOral Activity (externally moderated)

Duration:

10 minutes
approx.

Weight:

25%

Details:

Presentation followed by interaction with the teacher

History

Description of the Course

History is a two-year course which surveys selected key issues in world history from approximately 1800 until the mid-twentieth century, including an intensive study of the struggles for rights and freedoms in the mid-20th Century.

History is more than the study of the past. It is the process of recording, reconstructing and
interpreting the past through the investigation of a variety of sources. It is a discipline that
gives people an understanding of themselves and others in relation to the world, both past and present.

Aims of the Programme
  • Promote an understanding of history as a discipline, including the nature and diversity of its sources, methods and interpretations.
  • Encourage an understanding of the present through critical reflection upon the past.
  • Encourage an understanding of the impact of historical developments at national, regional and international levels.
  • Develop an awareness of one’s own historical identity through the study of the historical experiences of different cultures.

Students of history should learn how the discipline works. It is an exploratory subject that poses
questions without providing definitive answers. In order to understand the past, students
must engage with it both through exposure to primary historical sources and through the work
of historians. Historical study involves both selection and interpretation of data and critical
evaluation of it. Students of history should appreciate the relative nature of historical knowledge
and understanding, as each generation reflects its own world and preoccupations and as more
evidence emerges. A study of history both requires and develops an individual’s understanding of, and empathy for, people living in other periods and contexts.

Students will be expected to undertake and complete an historical investigation. The historical investigation is a problem-solving activity that enables students to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge to a historical topic that interests them and that need
not be related to the syllabus. The internal assessment allows for flexibility and encourages
students to use their own initiative. The emphasis is on a specific historical inquiry that enables the student to develop and apply the skills of a historian by selecting and analysing a good range of source material and managing diverse interpretations. The activity demands that students search for, select, evaluate and use evidence to reach a relevant conclusion.

The content of the history course is intrinsically interesting and it is hoped that many students who follow it will become fascinated with the discipline, developing a lasting interest in it, whether or not they continue to study it formally.

The international perspective in Diploma Programme history provides a sound platform for
the promotion of international understanding and, inherently, the intercultural awareness necessary to prepare students for global citizenship. Above all, it helps to foster respect and understanding of people and events in a variety of cultures throughout the world.

Objectives

Assessment objective 1: Knowledgeand understanding

  • Recall and select relevant historical knowledge.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of historical context.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of historical processes: cause and effect; continuity and
    change. Understand historical sources (SL paper 1 and HL paper 1).
  • Deploy detailed, in-depth knowledge (HL paper 3).
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a specific historical topic (IA).

Assessment objective 2: Application and interpretation

  • Apply historical knowledge as evidence.
  • Show awareness of different approaches to, and interpretations of, historical issues and events.
  • Compare and contrast historical sources as evidence (SL paper 1 and HL paper 1).
  • Explain the importance of historical sources (HL paper 1).
  • Present a summary of evidence (IA).

Assessment objective 3: Synthesis and evaluation.

  • Evaluate different approaches to, and interpretations of, historical issues and events.
  • Evaluate historical sources as evidence (SL paper 1, HL paper 1 and IA).
  • Evaluate and synthesize evidence from both historical sources and background knowledge (SL paper 1and HL paper 1).
  • Develop critical commentary using the evidence base (SL/HL paper 2 and HL paper 3).
  • Synthesize by integrating evidence and critical commentary (HL paper 3).
  • Present an analysis of a summary of evidence (IA).

Assessment objective 4: Use of historical skills.

  • Demonstrate the ability to structure an essay answer, using evidence to support
    relevant, balancedand focused historical arguments (SL/HL paper 2 and HL paper 3).
  • Demonstrate evidence of research skills, organization and referencing (IA).
Topics Studied

Standard Level

Rights and protest

This prescribed subject focuses on struggles for rights and freedoms in the mid-20th century. Two case studies are prescribed, from two different regions of the world, and both of these case studies must be studied. The first case study explores the civil rights movement in the US between 1954 and the passing of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. The second case study explores protests against apartheid in South Africa. It focuses specifically on the years 1948– 1964, beginning with the election of the National Party in 1948 and ending with the imprisonment of Nelson Mandela and his codefendants following the Rivonia trial in 1964.

20th Century World History Topics: Independence movements (1800– 2000)

This theme focuses on the emergence of new states in the 19th and 20th centuries. It
explores the origins and rise of independence movements, the reasons for their success, the
challenges that new states faced in their first 10 years, and the responses to those challenges.

Evolution and development of democratic states (1848–2000)

This topic covers the evolution and development of democratic multiparty states in a global context from the mid-19th century through to the end of the 20th century.

The topic focuses on exploring the emergence of democratic states, the challenges they faced
in maintaining and extending democratic practices (sometimes unsuccessfully), responses to social, economic and political issues, and the extension of constitutional rights.

Higher Level

Independence movements (1763–1830)

This section focuses on the various forces that contributed to the rise of the independence movements, the similar and different paths that the movements followed, and the immediate effects of independence in the region. It explores the political, intellectual and military contributions of their leaders, and the sometimes contradictory views that shaped
the emergence of the new nations.

Political developments in Latin America (1945–1980)

This section focuses on domestic and political developments in Latin America after 1945. Most Latin American countries experienced social, economic and political changes and challenges. Political responses to these forces varied from country to country— from the continuation of democracy to “populist” movements to outright conflict, revolution and the establishment of authoritarian regimes in the 1960s and 1970s. Areas of study include: conditions for the rise to power of new leaders; economic and social policies; treatment of minorities.

Civil rights and social movements in the Americas post-1945

This section examines the origins, nature, challenges and achievements of civil rights and social movements after 1945. Causes of some of these movements may be pre-1945. These movements represented the attempts to achieve equality for groups that were norecognized or accepted as full members of society,,and they challenged established authority and attitudes.

Assessment Outline
Standard Level Assessment

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

1 Hour
24 marks

Weight:

30%

Details:

Prescribed Subject

Paper 2

Duration:

1.5 Hours
30 marks

Weight:

45%

Details:

20th Century Topics

Internal Assessment

Historical Investigation

Duration:

Approximately 20 Hours
25 marks

Weight:

25%

Details:

On any area of the syllabus

Higher Level Assessment

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

1 Hour
24 marks

Weight:

20%

Details:

Prescribed Subject

Paper 2

Duration:

1.5 Hours
30 marks

Weight:

25%

Details:

20th Century Topics

Paper 3

Duration:

2.5 Hours
45 marks

Weight:

35%

Details:

Regional Options

Internal Assessment

Historical Investigation

Duration:

Approximately 20 Hours
25 marks

Weight:

20%

Details:

On any area of the syllabus

Business & Management

Description of the Course

Business and management is a rigorous and dynamic discipline that examines business decisionmaking processes and how these decisions impact on and are affected by internal and external environments. It is the study of both the way in which individuals and groups interact in an organization and of the transformation of resources.

The course is designed to develop an understanding of business theory, as well as an ability to apply business principles, practices and skills. The application of tools and techniques of analysis facilitates an appreciation of complex business activities. The course considers the diverse range of business organizations and activities and the cultural and economic context in which business operates. Emphasis is placed on strategic decisionmaking and the day-to-day business functions of marketing, production, human resource management and finance. Links
between the topics are central to the course, and this integration promotes a holistic overview of
business activity. Through the extrapolation of six concepts underpinning the subject (change,
culture, ethics, globalization, innovation and strategy), the business management course allows students to develop their understanding of interdisciplinary concepts from a business management perspective.

Aims of the Programme
  • Promote the importance of exploring business issues from different cultural perspectives.
  • Encourage a holistic view of the world of business.
  • Enable the student to develop the capacity to think critically and strategically about individual and organizational behaviour.
  • Enhance the student’s ability to make informed business decisions.
  • Enable the student to appreciate the nature and significance of change in a
    local, regional and global context.
  • Promote awareness of environmental, social, and ethical factors in the actions of individuals and organizations.
  • Develop an understanding of the importance of innovation in a business environment.
Objectives

Having followed the business and management course, students will be expected to:

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of terminology, concepts, principles and
    theories;
  • make business decisions by interpreting data, applying appropriate tools and techniques;
  • analyse and evaluate business decisions using a variety of sources;
  • evaluate business strategies and/or practices showing evidence of critical thinking;
  • evaluate business decisions, formulating recommendations;
  • apply skills and knowledge learned in the subject to hypothetical and real situations;
  • produce well-structured written material using business terminology;
  • select and use quantitative and qualitative business tools, techniques and methods;
  • select and use business material, from a range of primary and secondary sources;
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the six concepts that underpin the subject.
Topics Studied
  • Topic 1: Business organization and environment
  • Topic 2: Human resource management
  • Topic 3: Finance and accounts
  • Topic 4: Marketing
  • Topic 5: Operations management
Assessment Outline
Standard Level Assessment

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

(1 ¼ hour)

Method:

Based on a case study issued in advance, with additional unseen
material included in section B. Section A- Students answer three of
four structured questions. Section B- Students answer one compulsory structured question.

Weight:

35%

Details:

All five sections of the SL syllabus

Paper 2

Duration:

(1 ¼ hour)

Method:

Section A- Students answer one of two structured questions based on stimulus material with a quantitative focus. Section B- Students answer one of three structured questions based on stimulus material. Section C- Students answer one of three extended response questions based on two concepts that underpin the course.

Weight:

40%

Details:

All five sections of the SL syllabus

Internal Assessment

Duration:

15 hours

Method:

Written commentary A commentary based on three to
five supporting documents about a real issue or problem facing a
particular organization. (Maximum 1,500 words)

Weight:

25%

Details:

Any topic from the HL/SL core syllabus

Higher Level Assessment

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

(2 ¼ hour)

Method:

Based on a case study issued in advance. Section A- Three structured
questions to answer two. Section B- One compulsory question including evaluative skills. Section C- One compulsory question focusing on strategic decision-making, based on an
extension material.

Weight:

35%

Details:

All five sections of the HL syllabus

Paper 2

Duration:

(2 ¼ hour)

Method:

Section A- Students answer one of two structured questions
based on stimulus material with a quantitative focus. Section B- Students answer two of
three structured questions based on stimulus material. Section C- Students answer one of three extended response questions based on two concepts that underpin the course.

Weight:

40%

Details:

All five sections of the HL syllabus

Internal Assessment

Duration:

30 hours

Method:

Research project Research proposal and action plan—a working document not
part of the actual report, but part of planning. Report that addresses an issue
facing an organization or analyses a decision to be made by an organization.
(Maximum 2,000 words)

Weight:

25%

Details:

Any topic from the full HL syllabus

Economics

Description of the Course

Economics is a dynamic social science. The study of it is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements.

The Economics course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and
societies. These economic theories are not to be studied in a vacuum –rather, they are to
be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability.

The ethical dimensions involved in the application of economic theories and policies permeate
throughout the economics course as students are required to consider and reflect on human endgoals and values.

Aims of the Programme
  • Develop an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theories and concepts and their real-world application.
  • Develop an appreciation of the impact on individuals and societies of economic interactions between nations.
  • Develop an awareness of development issues facing nations as they undergo the process of change.
Objectives

Having followed the economics course at SL or HL, students will be expected to do the following:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of current economic issues and data.
  • Apply economic concepts and theories to real-world situations.
  • Identify and interpret economic data.
  • Use economic concepts and examples to construct and present an argument.
  • Discuss and evaluate economic information and theories.
  • Produce well-structured written material, using appropriate economic terminology.
  • Use correctly labeled diagrams to help explain economic concepts and theories.
Topics Studied

Section 1: Microeconomics
Section 2: Macroeconomics
Section 3: International economics
Section 4: Development economics

Assessment Outline
Standard Level Assessment

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

1 ½ hours

Weight:

40%

Details:

Section A Microeconomics Students answer one question from a choice of two
Section B Macroeconomics Students answer one question from a choice of two

 

Paper 2

Duration:

1 ½ hours

Weight:

40%

Details:

Section A International economics Students answer one question from a choice of two
Section B Development economics Students answer one question from a choice of two

Internal Assessment

Duration:

20 hours

Weight:

20%

Details:

Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different sections of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media. Maximum 750 words each

Higher Level Assessment

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

1 ½ hours

Weight:

30%

Details:

Section A Microeconomics Students answer one question from a choice of tw0
Section B Macroeconomics Students answer one question from a choice of two

Paper 2

Duration:

1 ½ hours

Weight:

30%

Details:

Section A International economics Students answer one question from a choice of two
Section B Development economics Students answer one question from a choice of two

Paper 3

Duration:

1 hour

Weight:

20%

Details:

Sections 1 to 4 of the Syllabus content, including HL extensions Students answer two questions from a choice of three

Internal Assessment

Duration:

20 hours

Weight:

20%

Details:

Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different sections of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media. Maximum 750 words each

Psychology

Description of the Course

Psychology is the systematic study of behaviour and mental processes. Psychology has its roots in both the natural and social sciences, leading to a variety of research designs and applications, and providing a unique approach to understanding modern society.

IB psychology examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences
on human behaviour, thereby adopting an integrative approach. Understanding how psychological knowledge isgenerated, developed and applied enables students to achieve a greater understanding of themselves and appreciate the diversity of human behaviour. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are key considerations in IB psychology

Aims of the Programme

Develop an awareness of how psychological research can beapplied for the benefit of human
beings.

  • Ensure that ethical practices are upheld in psychological inquiry.
  • Develop an understanding of the biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on
    human behaviour.
  • Develop an understanding of alternative explanations of behaviour.
  • Understand and use diverse methods of psychological inquiry.
Objectives

1. Knowledge and comprehension of specified content.

  • Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of key terms and concepts in psychology..
  • Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of psychological research methods..
  • Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of a range of appropriately identified
    psychological theories and research studies.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of the biological, cognitive and sociocultural levels of analysis.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of one option at SL or two options at HL.

2. Application and analysis

  • Demonstrate an ability to use examples of psychological research and psychological concepts to formulate an argument in response to a specific question.
  • At HL only, analyse qualitative psychological research in terms of methodological, reflexive and ethical issues involved in research.

3. Synthesis and evaluation

Evaluate psychological theories and empirical studies.

  • Discuss how biological, cognitive and sociocultural levels of analysis can be used to explain behaviour.
  • Evaluate research methods used to investigate behaviour.

4. Selection and use of skills appropriate to psychology

  • Demonstrate the acquisition of knowledge and skills required for experimental design, data collection and presentation, data analysis and interpretation.
  • At HL only, analyse data using an appropriate inferential statistical test.
  • Write an organized response.
Topics Studied

Part 1: Core

  • Biological level of analysis.
  • Cognitive level of analysis
  • Sociocultural level of analysis

Part 2: Options Abnormal psychology

  • Developmental psychology
  • Health psychology
  • Psychology of human relationships
  • Sport psychology

Part 3: Qualitative research methodology (HL only)

  • Qualitative research in psychology

Part 4: Simple experimental study

  • Introduction to experimental research methodology
ASSESSMENT OUTLINE
STANDARD LEVEL ASSESSMENT

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

2 Hours 46 marks

Method:

Section A:
Three compulsory questions on part
1 of the syllabus.
Section B
Three questions on part 1 of the
syllabus. Students choose one
question to answer in essay form.

Weight:

50%

 

Paper 2

Duration:

1 hour 22marks

Method:

Fifteen questions on part 2 of the syllabus. Students choose one question to answer in essay form.

Weight:

25%

 

Internal Assessment

Research report

Duration:

Approx 20 Hours, 20 marks

Method:

A report of a simple experimental study conducted by the student

Weight:

25%

Higher Level Assessment

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

2 Hours 46 marks

Method:

Section A
Three compulsory questions on part 1 of the syllabus.
Section B
Three questions on part 1 of the syllabus. Students choose one question to
answer in essay form

Weight:

35%

Paper 2

Duration:

1.5 Hours, 44 marks

Method:

Fifteen questions on part 2 of the syllabus. Students choose two questions to
answer in essay form.

Weight:

20%

Paper 3

Duration:

2.5 Hours, 60 marks

Method:

Three compulsory questions based on an unseen text, covering part 3 of the
syllabus

Weight:

35%

Internal Assessment

Research report

Duration:

Approx 20 Hours, 28 marks

Method:

A report of an experimental study conducted by the student
On any

Weight:

20%

Biology

Description of the Course

This is a two-year programme that seeks to prepare the students for a better understanding of living organisms around them. The programme provides a body of facts and develops a broad and general understanding of the principles of the subject. There are four basic concepts that run throughout the whole course: relationship between structure and function, universality versus diversity, equilibrium within systems and evolution.

The biology course is intended to develop the students’ practical skills and techniques. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and information and communication technology skills, which are essential in modern scientific endeavour and are important lifeenhancing
transferable skills in their own right.

Through studying any of the group 4 subjects, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the “scientific method” may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that distinguishes the group 4 subjects from other disciplines and characterizes each of the subjects within group 4.

Aims of the Programme
  • Provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students.
  • Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology.
  • Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology.
  • Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information.
  • Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities.
  • Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills.
  • Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of science.
  • Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology. Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated
    with science and scientists.
  • Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method.
Objectives

Demonstrate an understanding of:

  • scientific facts and concepts;
  • scientific methods and techniques;
  • scientific terminology;
  • methods of presenting scientific information.

Apply and use:

  • scientific facts and concepts;
  • scientific methods and techniques;
  • scientific terminology to communicate effectively;
  • appropriate methods to present scientific information.

Construct, analyse and evaluate:

  • hypotheses, research questions and predictions;
  • scientific methods and techniques; 
  • scientific explanations.

Demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance and responsibility.

Appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem solving;

Demonstrate the manipulative skills necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety.

Topics Studied

Core (95h)

  • Topic 1: Cell Biology
  • Topic 2: Molecular Biology
  • Topic 3: Genetics
  • Topic 4: Ecology
  • Topic 5: Evolution and biodiversity
  • Topic 6: Human physiology

Additional HL (60h)

  • Topic 7: Nucleic acids
  • Topic 8: Metabolism, cell respiration and photosynthesis
  • Topic 9: Plant biology
  • Topic 10: Genetics and evolution
  • Topic 11: Animal physiology

One additional optional topic is covered chosen from:

Options for all (15h/25h)

  • Option A: Neurobiology and behaviour
  • Option B: Biotechnology and bioinformatics
  • Option C: Ecology and conservation
  • Option D: Human physiology
Assessment Outline
Standard Level Assessment

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

45m

Method:

Core level Content (Multiple Choice)

Weight:

20%

Paper 2

Duration:

1h15m

Method:

Core level Content (Short Answer and extended response)

Weight:

40%

 

Paper 3

Duration:

1h

Method:

(Short-answer questions based on experimental skills and short and extended-answer questions based on the SL optional topic)

Weight:

20%

Internal Assessment

Scientific report

Duration:

40h

Method:

Practical activities + Group 4 project +
Individual Investigation

Weight:

20%

Higher Level Assessment

External Assessment

Paper 1

Duration:

1h

Method:

Core and AH level Content
(Multiple Choice)

Weight:

20%

Paper 2

Duration:

2h15m

Method:

Core and AH level Content
(Short Answer and extended response)

Weight:

36%

Paper 3

Duration:

1h15m

Method:

(Short-answer questions based on experimental skills and short and extended-answer questions based on the HL optional topic)

Weight:

24%

Internal Assessment

Scientific report

Duration:

60h

Method:

Practical activities + Group 4 project + Individual Investigation

Weight:

20%

Chemistry

Description of the Course

Chemistry is a two year programme that seeks to give students a wider understanding of the chemical processes that underpin both the physical environment and all biological systems. During the course students will acquire core knowledge of basic principles in chemistry, as well as practical and investigation skills.

The four main areas of study are:

Chemical bonding

Understanding the principles of atomic bonding and how this influences physical properties of materials.

Chemical reactions

What happens when chemicals react? Student will understand the fundamentals of different chemical reactions and the energy changes that occur.

Organic chemistry

From crude oil to medicines, understanding the structure of organic molecules and the influence this has on designing new materials.

Chemistry and Industry

Chemistry is the cornerstone of many industrial processes, and it has an economic and environmental impact on many countries. Students will be made aware of the chemical reactions involved in some of these industries

Aims of the Programme

Provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students.

Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology.

Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology.

Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information.

Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities.

Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills.

Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of science.

Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology.

Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and scientists.

Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method.

Objectives

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

Facts, concepts and Terminology

Methodologies and techniques

Communicating scientific information.

Apply:

Facts, concepts and terminology

Methodologies and techniques

Methods of communicating scientific information.

Formulate, analyse and evaluate:

Hypotheses, research questions and predictions

Methodologies and techniques

Primary and secondary data

Scientific explanations

Demonstrate the appropriate research, experimental and personal skills necessary to carry out insightful and ethical investigations

Topics Studied

Core (80h)

Topic 1: Stoichiometric relationships

Topic 2: Atomic structure

Topic 3: Periodicity

Topic 4: Chemical Bonding and Structure

Topic 5: Energetics/ thermochemistry

Topic 6: Chemical Kinetics

Topic 7: Equilibrium

Topic 8: Acids and Bases

Topic 9: Redox processes

Topic 10: Organic Chemistry

Topic 11: Measurement and data Processing

Additional HL (55h)

Topic 12: Atomic structure

Topic 13: The periodic table-the transition metals

Topic 14: Chemical Bonding and Structure

Topic 15: Energetics/ thermochemistry

Topic 16: Chemical Kinetics

Topic 17: Equilibrium

Topic 18: Acids and Bases

Topic 19: Redox processes

Topic 20: Organic Chemistry

Topic 21 Measurement and analysis

One additional option is covered chosen from:

Options for all (15h/22h)

Option A: Materials

Option B: Biochemistry.

Option C: Energy

Option D: Medicinal chemistry

Assessment Outline
Standard Level Assessment
  External Assessment Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Paper 3Scientific Report
ContentCore level Content
(Multiple Choice)
Core level Content
(Short Answer and extended
response)
SL Option level Content.
(Short Answer and extended
response)
Individual
Investigation
Time45m1h15m1h10h
Weighting20%40%20%20%
Higher Level Assessment
 External Assessment  Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Paper 3Scientific Report
ContentCore and AH level Content (Multiple Choice)Core and AH level Content (Short Answer and extended response)HL Option level Content. (Short Answer and extended response)Individual Investigation
Time1h2h15m1h15m10h
Weighting20%36%24%20%

Physic

This is a two-year programme that seeks to prepare the students for a better understanding of the physical world around them. The programme provides new insights into the universe itself, from the very smallest particles-quarks-to the vast distances between galaxies. The physics course is intended to develop the students’ practical skills and techniques while increase facility in the use of Mathematics, which is the language of Physics. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and information and communication technology skills, which are essential in modern scientific endeavour and are important life-enhancing transferable skills in their own right.

Through studying any of the group 4 subjects, students should become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. While the “scientific method” may take on a wide variety of forms, it is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work that distinguishes the group 4 subjects from other disciplines and characterizes each of the subjects within group 4.

Aims of the Programme
  • Provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students.
  • Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology.
  • Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology.
  • Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesize scientific information.
  • Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities.
  • Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills.
  • Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of science
  • Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology.
  • Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and scientists.
  • Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method.
Objectives

Demonstrate an understanding of:

  • scientific facts and concepts;
  • scientific methods and techniques;
  • scientific terminology;
  • methods of presenting scientific information.

 

Apply and use:

  • scientific facts and concepts;
  • scientific methods and techniques;
  • scientific terminology to communicate effectively;
  • appropriate methods to present scientific information;

 

Construct, analyse and evaluate.

  • hypotheses, research questions and predictions;
  • scientific methods and techniques;
  • scientific explanations;

 

Demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance and responsibility appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem solving.

Demonstrate the manipulative skills necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety.

Core:

  • Measurements and uncertainties
  • Mechanics
  • Thermal physics
  • Waves
  • Electricity and magnetism
  • Circular motion and gravitation
  • Atomic, nuclear and particle physics
  • Energy production

Additional higher level (HL)

Wave phenomena

  1. Fields
  2. Electromagnetic induction
  3. Quantum and nuclear physics

Options for all:

  1. Relativity
  2. Engineering physics
  3. Imaging
  4. Astrophysics

Practical scheme of work

Practical activities Individual investigation (internal assessment – IA) Group 4 project

Assessment Outline
Standard Level Assessment
 External Assessment  Internal Assessment
ContentCore level Content (Multiple Choice)Core level Content (Short Answer and extended response)SL Option level Content. (Short Answer and extended response)Individual Investigation
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Paper 3Scientific Report
Time45m1h15m1h10h
Weighting20%40%20%20%
Higher Level Assessment
 External Assessment  Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Paper 3Scientific Report
ContentCore and AH level Content (Multiple Choice)Core and AH level Content (Short Answer and extended response)HL Option level Content. (Short Answer and extended response)Individual Investigation
Time1h2h15m1h15m10h
Weighting20%36%24%20%

Environmental Systems and Societies

 

Description of the course

As a transdisciplinary subject, environmental systems and societies is designed to combine the techniques and knowledge associated with group 4 (the experimental sciences) with those associated with group 3 (individuals and societies).

The prime intent of this course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face.

This course attempts to discuss the issues surrounding resource use at various

scales—from that of the individual to that of the global community.

The systems approach provides the core methodology of this course. It is amplified by other sources, such as economic, historical, cultural, socio-political and scientific, to provide a holistic perspective on environmental issues.

Aims of the programme
  • Promote understanding of environmental processes at a variety of scales, from local to global.
  • Provide a body of knowledge, methodologies and skills that can be used in the analysis of environmental issues at local and global levels.
  • Enable students to apply the knowledge, methodologies and skills gained.
  • Promote critical awareness of a diversity of cultural perspectives.
  • Recognize the extent to which technology plays a role in both causing and solving environmental problems.
  • Appreciate the value of local as well as international collaboration in resolving environmental problems.
  • Appreciate that environmental issues may be controversial, and may provoke a variety of responses.
  • Appreciate that human society is both directly and indirectly linked to the environment at a number of levels and at a variety of scales.
Objectives
  • Demonstrate an understanding of information, terminology, concepts, methodologies and skills with regard to environmental issues.
  • Apply and use information, terminology, concepts, methodologies and skills with regard to environmental issues.
  • Synthesize, analyse and evaluate research questions, hypotheses, methods and scientific explanations with regard to environmental issues.
  • Using a holistic approach, make reasoned and balanced judgments using appropriate economic, historical, cultural, socio-political and scientific sources.
  • Articulate and justify a personal viewpoint on environmental issues with reasoned argument while appreciating alternative viewpoints, including the perceptions of different cultures.
  • Demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation and responsibility appropriate for effective investigation and problem solving.
  • Select and demonstrate the appropriate practical and research skills necessary to carry out investigations with due regard to precision.
Topics studied

For the IB, this course is studied only at SL.

Topic 1: Systems and models

Topic 2: The ecosystem

Topic 3: Human population, carrying capacity and resource use

Topic 4: Conservation and biodiversity

Topic 5: Pollution management

Topic 6: The issue of global warming

Topic 7: Environmental value systems

Assessment outline
 External Assessment Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Portfolio of Practicals
ContentPaper 1 is made up of short-answer and data-based questions.Paper 2 consists of two sections, A and B. In section A, students will be provided with a range of data in a variety of forms relating to a specific case study. Students are required to make reasoned and balanced judgments by analysing this data.
In section B, students are required to answer two structured essay questions from a choice of four.
It comprises a series of practical and fieldwork activities that are undertaken as part of the practical scheme of work.
The performance in internal assessment is judged against four assessment criteria.
Time1h2h30h
Weighting30%50%20%

Mathematics

Description of the Course

Individual students have different needs, interests, and abilities, so there are three different courses in mathematics. These courses are designed for different types of students: those who wish to study mathematics in depth, either as a subject in its own right or to pursue their interests in areas related to mathematics; those who wish to gain a degree of understanding and competence better to understand their approach to other subjects; and those who may not as yet be aware how mathematics may be relevant to their studies and in their daily lives. Each course is designed to meet the needs of a particular group of students. Therefore, great care should be taken to select the course that is most appropriate for an individual student.

In making this selection, individual students should be advised to take account of the following types of factors:

  • Their own abilities in mathematics and the type of mathematics in which they can be successful
  • Their own interest in mathematics, and those particular areas of the subject that may hold the most interest for them
  • Their other choices of subjects within the framework of the Diploma Programme
  • Their academic plans, in particular the subjects they wish to study in future
  • Their choice of career

 

Teachers will assist with the selection process and offer advice to students about how to choose the most appropriate course from the three mathematics courses available.

Mathematical Studies (150 hours)

This course is available only at standard level, and is equivalent in status to mathematics SL, but addresses different needs. It has an emphasis on applications of mathematics, and the largest section is on statistical techniques. It is designed for students with varied mathematical background and abilities. It offers students opportunities to learn important concepts and techniques and to gain an understanding of a wide variety of mathematical topics. It prepares students to be able to solve problems in a variety of settings, to develop more sophisticated mathematical reasoning and to enhance their critical thinking. The individual project is an extended piece of work based on personal research involving the collection, analysis and evaluation of data.

Students taking this course are well prepared for a career in social sciences, humanities, languages or arts. These students may need to utilize the statistics and logical reasoning that they have learned as part of the mathematical studies SL course in their future studies.

Mathematics Standard Level (150 hrs)

This course caters for students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. The majority of these students will expect to need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as chemistry, economics, psychology and business administration.

Mathematics Higher Level (240 hrs)

This course caters for students with a good background in mathematics who are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills. The majority of these students will be expecting to include mathematics as a major component of their university studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such as physics, engineering and technology. Others may take this subject because they have a strong interest in mathematics and enjoy meeting its challenges and engaging with its problems.

Aims of the Programme
  • Enjoy mathematics, and develop an appreciation of the elegance and power of mathematics .
  • Develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics.
  • Communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts .
  • Develop logical, critical and creative thinking, and patience and persistence in problem-solving.
  • Employ and refine their powers of abstraction and generalization.
  • Apply and transfer skills to alternative situations, to other areas of knowledge and to future developments.
  • Appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other.
  • Appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the work of mathematicians and the applications of mathematics.
  • Appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives.
  • appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other disciplines, and as a particular “area of knowledge” in the ToK course.

One of the aims of this course is to enable students to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives of mathematics. Teachers will achieve this aim by discussing relevant issues as they arise and making reference to appropriate background information.

For example:

  • Differences in notation.
  • The lives of mathematicians set in a historical and/or social context.
  • The cultural context of mathematical discoveries.
  • The ways specific mathematical discoveries were made and the techniques used to make them.
  • How the attitudes of different societies towards areas of mathematics are demonstrated.
  • The universality of mathematics as a means of communication.
Objectives

Problem-solving is central to learning mathematics and involves the acquisition of mathematical skills and concepts in a wide range of situations, including non-routine, open-ended and real-world problems. Students will be expected to demonstrate the following:

Knowledge and understanding:

  • recall, select and use their knowledge of mathematical facts, concepts and techniques in a variety of familiar and unfamiliar contexts.

Problem-solving:

  • recall, select and use their knowledge of mathematical skills, results and models in both real and abstract contexts to solve problems.

Communication and interpretation:

  • transform common realistic contexts into mathematics; comment on the context; sketch or draw mathematical diagrams, graphs or constructions both on paper and using technology; record methods, solutions and conclusions using standardized notation.

Technology:

  • use technology, accurately, appropriately and efficiently both to explore new ideas and to solve problems.

Reasoning:

  • construct mathematical arguments through use of precise statements, logical deduction and inference, and by the manipulation of mathematical expressions.

Inquiry approaches:

  • investigate unfamiliar situations, both abstract and real-world, involving organizing and analysing information, making conjectures, drawing conclusions and testing their validity.
Calculators

For each of all courses, students need a graphic display calculator: the Texas Instruments TI-84+. Students can buy this calculator from the school.

Topics Studied
STUDIESSTANDARDHIGHER
Number and algebraAlgebraAlgebra
Descriptive statisticsFunctions & EquationsFunctions and equations
Logic, sets and probability Circular Functions & TrigonometryCircular functions and trigonometry
Statistical applicationsVectorsVectors
Geometry and trigonometryStatistics & ProbabilityStatistics and probability
Mathematical modelsCalculusCalculus
Introduction to differential calculusOption syllabus content
Students must study all the sub-topics in one of the following options as listed in the syllabus details.
Statistics and probability
Sets, relations and groups
Calculus
Discrete mathematics
Assessment Outline
Mathematical Studies Assessment
 External Assessment Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Project
Content15 compulsory short-response questions based on the whole syllabus5 compulsory extended-response questions based on the whole syllabusThe project is an individual piece of work involving the collection of information or the generation of measurements, and the analysis and evaluation of the information or measurements.
Time1h30m1h30m25h
Weighting40%40%20%
Standard Level Assessment  
 External Assessment Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Mathematical exploration
ContentNo calculator allowed
Section A
Compulsory short-response questions based on the core syllabus.
Section B
Compulsory extended-response questions based on the core syllabus.
Graphic display calculator (GDC) required
Section A
Compulsory short-response questions based on the core syllabus.
Section B
Compulsory extended-response questions based on the core syllabus.
Internal assessment in Mathematics SL is an individual exploration. This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics.
Time1h30m1h30m10h
Weighting40%40%20%
Higher Level Assessment
  External Assessment Internal Assessment
FormatPaper 1Paper 2Paper 3Exploration
ContentNo calculator allowed
Section A
Compulsory short-response questions based on the core syllabus.
Section B
Compulsory extended-response questions based on the core syllabus.
Graphic display calculator (GDC) required
Section A
Compulsory short-response questions based on the core syllabus.
Section B
Compulsory extended-response questions based on the core syllabus.
Graphic display calculator (GDC) required
Compulsory extended-response questions based mainly on the syllabus options.
Internal assessment in Mathematics HL is an individual exploration.
This is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics.
Time2h2h1h10h
Weighting30%30%20%20%

Visual Arts

Description of the Course

Visual Arts is a two-year programme that enables students to engage in both practical exploration and artistic production, and in independent contextual, visual and critical investigation. The course is designed to enable students to study visual arts in higher education and also welcomes those students who seek life enrichment through visual arts.

Aims of the Programme
  • Investigate past, present and emerging forms of visual arts and engage in producing, appreciating and evaluating these.
  • Develop an understanding of visual arts from a local, national and international perspective.
  • Build confidence in responding visually and creatively to personal and cultural experiences.
  • Develop skills in, and sensitivity to, the creation of works that reflect active and individual involvement.
  • Take responsibility for the direction of their learning through the acquisition of effective working practices.
Objectives

Having followed the visual arts course at HL or SL, students will be expected to:

  • Respond to and analyse critically and contextually the function, meaning and artistic qualities of past, present and emerging art, using the specialist vocabulary of visual arts.
  • Develop and present independent ideas and practice, and explain the connections between these and the work of others.
  • Explore and develop ideas and techniques for studio work through integrated contextual study and first-hand observations.
  • Develop and maintain a close relationship between investigation and a purposeful, creative process in studio work.
  • Produce personally relevant works of art that reveal evidence of exploration of ideas that reflect cultural and historical awareness.
  • Develop and demonstrate technical competence and artistic qualities that challenge and extend personal boundaries (option A) and technical competence and self-direction (option B).

Option A

Option A is designed for students who wish to concentrate on studio practice in visual arts. Students will produce investigation workbooks to support, inform, develop and refine studio work through sustained contextual, visual and critical investigation.

At both HL and SL, the investigation workbooks are integral to studio practice and should reflect the student’s critical visual and written investigation.

Option B

Option B is designed for students who wish to concentrate on contextual, visual and critical investigation in visual arts. In their investigation workbooks students will explore fully an integrated range of ideas within a contextual, visual and critical framework and produce studio work based on their visual and written investigation.

Students should demonstrate connections between academic investigation and studio work.

Assessment Outline
  Weighting
SLHL
Part 1: Comparative study Students at SL analyse and compare different artworks by different artists. This independent critical and contextual investigation explores artworks, objects and artifacts from differing cultural contexts. SL students submit 10-15 screens which examine and compare at least three artworks, at least two of which should be by different artists. The work selected for comparison and analysis should come from contrasting contexts (local, national, international and/or intercultural). SL students submit a list of sources used. Part 1: Comparative study Students at HL analyse and compare different artworks by different artists. This independent critical and contextual investigation explores artworks, objects and artefacts from differing cultural contexts. HL students submit 10-15 screens which examine and compare at least three artworks, at least two of which need to be by different artists. The works selected for comparison and analysis should come from contrasting contexts (local, national, international and/or intercultural). HL students submit 3–5 screens which analyse the extent to which their work and practices have been influenced by the art and artists examined. HL students submit a list of sources used. 20%
Part 2: Process portfolio Students at SL submit carefully selected materials which evidence their experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of visual arts activities during the two-year course. SL students submit 9-18 screens which evidence their sustained experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of art-making activities. For SL students the submitted work must be in at least two art-making forms, each from separate columns of the art-making forms table. Part 2: Process portfolio Students at HL submit carefully selected materials which evidence their experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of visual arts activities during the two-year course. HL students submit 13-25 screens which evidence their sustained experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of art-making activities. For HL students the submitted work must have been created in at least three art-making forms, selected from a minimum of two columns of the art-making forms table. 40
Internal assessment
Part 3: Exhibition Students at SL submit for assessment a selection of resolved artworks from their exhibition. The selected pieces should show evidence of their technical accomplishment during the visual arts course and an understanding of the use of materials, ideas and practices appropriate to visual communication. SL students submit a curatorial rationale that does not exceed 400 words. SL students submit 4–7 artworks. SL students submit exhibition text (stating the title, medium, size and intention) for each selected artwork. SL students may submit two photographs of their overall exhibition. These exhibition photographs provide an understanding of the context of the exhibition and the size and scope of the works. While the photographs will not be used to assess individual artworks, they may give the moderator insight into how a candidate has considered the overall experience of the viewer in their exhibition. Part 3: Exhibition Students at HL submit for assessment a selection of resolved artworks from their exhibition. The selected pieces should show evidence of their technical accomplishment during the visual arts course and an understanding of the use of materials, ideas and practices appropriate to visual communication. HL students submit a curatorial rationale that does not exceed 700 words. HL students submit 8–11 artworks. HL students submit exhibition text (stating the title, medium, size and intention) for each selected artwork. HL students may submit two photographs of their overall exhibition. These exhibition photographs provide an understanding of the context of the exhibition and the size and scope of the works. While the photographs will not be used to assess individual artworks, they may give the moderator insight into how a candidate has considered the overall experience of the viewer in their exhibition. 40%

ToK: Theory of Knowledge

Description of the Course

ToK plays a special role in the Diploma Programme by providing an opportunity for students to reflect on the nature of knowledge. The task of ToK is to emphasize connections between areas of knowledge and link them to the knower in such a way that the knower can become aware of his or her own perspectives and those of the various groups whose knowledge he or she shares. ToK, therefore, explores both the personal and shared aspects of knowledge and investigates the relationships between them.

The raw material of ToK is knowledge itself. Students think about how knowledge is arrived at in the various disciplines, what the disciplines have in common and the differences between them. The fundamental question of ToK is “how do we know that?” The answer might depend on the discipline and the purpose to which the knowledge is put. ToK explores methods of inquiry and tries to establish what it is about these methods that make them effective as knowledge tools. In this sense ToK is concerned with knowing about knowing.

The individual knower has to try to make sense of the world and understand his or her relationship to it. He or she has at his or her disposal the resources of the areas of knowledge, for example, the academic disciplines studied in the Diploma Programme. He or she also has access to ways of knowing such as memory, intuition, reason and sense perception that help us navigate our way in a complex world.

It is easy to be bewildered by the sheer diversity of the knowledge on offer. For example:

  • In physics, experiment and observation seem to be the basis for knowledge. The physicist might want to construct a hypothesis to explain observations that do not fit current thinking and devises and performs experiments to test this hypothesis. Results are then collected and analysed and, if necessary, the hypothesis modified to accommodate them.
  • In history there is no experimentation. Instead, documentary evidence provides the historian with the raw material for interpreting and understanding the recorded past of humanity. By studying these sources carefully a picture of a past event can be built up along with ideas about what factors might have caused it.
  • In a literature class students set about understanding and interpreting a text. No observation of the outside world is necessary, but there is a hope that the text can shed some light upon deep questions about what it is to be human in a variety of world situations or can act as a critique of the way in which we organize our societies.
  • Economics, by contrast, considers the question of how human societies allocate scarce resources. This is done by building elaborate mathematical models based upon a mixture of reasoning and empirical observation of relevant economic factors.
  • In the islands of Micronesia, a steersman successfully navigates between two islands 1,600 km apart without a map or a compass.

In each case above there is clearly knowledge at work, although the collection as a whole illustrates a wide variety of different types of knowledge. The task of ToK is to examine different areas of knowledge and find out what makes them different and what they have in common.

At the centre of the course is the idea of knowledge questions. These are questions such as:

  • What counts as evidence for X? what makes a good explanation in subject Y?
  • How do we judge which is the best model of Z?
  • How can we be sure of W?
  • What does theory T mean in the real world?
  • How do we know whether it is right to do S?

While these questions could seem slightly intimidating in the abstract, they become much more accessible when dealt with in specific practical contexts within the ToK course. They arise naturally in the subject areas, the extended essay and CAS. The intention is that these contexts provide concrete examples of knowledge questions that should promote student discussion.

Discussion forms the backbone of the ToK course. Students are invited to consider knowledge questions against the backdrop of their experiences of knowledge in their other Diploma Programme subjects but also in relation to the practical experiences offered by CAS and the formal research that takes place for the extended essay. The experiences of the student outside school also have a role to play in these discussions, although ToK seeks to strike a balance between the shared and personal aspects of knowledge.

Recognizing the discursive aspect of the course, the ToK presentation assesses the ability of the student to apply ToK thinking to a real-life situation. The ToK essay gives the opportunity to assess more formal argumentation prompted by questions of a more general nature.

ToK is a course in critical thinking but it is one that is specifically geared to an approach to knowledge that is mindful of the interconnectedness of the modern world. “Critical” in this context implies an analytical approach prepared to test the support for knowledge claims, aware of its own weaknesses, conscious of its perspectives and open to alternative ways of answering knowledge questions. It is a demanding course but one that is an essential component not only of the Diploma Programme but of lifelong learning.

Aims of the Programme

The overall aim of ToK is to encourage students to formulate answers to the question “how do you know?” in a variety of contexts, and to see the value of that question. This allows students to develop an enduring fascination with the richness of knowledge.

Specifically, the aims of the ToK course are for students to:

  • make connections between a critical approach to the construction of knowledge, the academic disciplines and the wider world;
  • develop an awareness of how individuals and communities construct knowledge and how this is critically examined;
  • develop an interest in the diversity and richness of cultural perspectives and an awareness of personal and ideological assumptions;
  • critically reflect on their own beliefs and assumptions, leading to more thoughtful, responsible and purposeful lives;
  • understand that knowledge brings responsibility which leads to commitment and action.
Objectives

It is expected that by the end of the ToK course, students will be able to:

  • identify and analyse the various kinds of justifications used to support knowledge claims;
  • formulate, evaluate and attempt to answer knowledge questions;
  • examine how academic disciplines/areas of knowledge generate and shape knowledge;
  • understand the roles played by ways of knowing in the construction of shared and personal knowledge;
  • explore links between knowledge claims, knowledge questions, ways of knowing and areas of knowledge;
  • demonstrate an awareness and understanding of different perspectives and be able to relate these to one’s own perspective;
  • explore a real-life/ contemporary situation from a ToK perspective in the presentation.
Topics Studied

The ToK course identifies eight specific Ways of Knowing (WoKs):

  • Language
  • Sense perception
  • Emotion
  • Reason
  • Imagination
  • Faith
  • Intuition
  • Memory

And distinguishes between eight Areas of Knowledge (AoKs):

  • Mathematics
  • Natural sciences
  • Human sciences
  • History
  • The arts
  • Ethics
  • Religious knowledge systems
  • Indigenous knowledge systems

Students must explore a range of WoKs and AoKs. Generally 4 WoKs and 6 AoKs are studied and explored in depth.

Assessment Outline
 Internal AssessmentExternal Assessment
FormatOral Presentation & Self EvaluationEssay (1600 words)
ContentExamination of a Knowledge question arising from real life situation of students' choicethe students' choice of one of six prescribed titles
Weighting33%67%

Extended Essay

Description

The extended essay is an in-depth study of a limited topic within a subject. Its purpose is to provide candidates with an opportunity to engage in independent research. Emphasis is placed on the process of engaging in personal research, on the communication of ideas and information in a logical and coherent manner, and on the overall presentation of the extended essay in compliance with these guidelines.

The subject in which the extended essay is written may be chosen from any of the subject areas offered by the International Baccalaureate. The subject chosen for the extended essay does not have to be one of the subjects being studied by the candidate for the diploma, but care should be taken to choose a subject about which the candidate has sufficient knowledge and skills.

Candidates should choose a topic for their extended essay in the first year of the IB course, and begin their research. The final essay, completed in the second year of the course, should be no more than 4000 words in length.

Assessment

All extended essays are externally assessed by IB examiners, and are marked on a scale from 0-36. IB examiners use these points to award a grade from A-E.

This grade is then combined with the grade received in the Theory of Knowledge course (ToK), and the candidate is awarded a maximum of 3 points to be added to their overall IB score.

CAS: Creativity, Activity, Service

Description

Creativity, activity, service or, CAS, is at the heart of the Diploma Programme. It is one of the three essential elements in every student’s Diploma Programme experience. It involves students in a range of activities alongside their academic studies throughout the Diploma Programme. The three strands of CAS, which are often interwoven with particular activities, are characterized as follows.

Creativity: arts, and other experiences that involve creative thinking.

Activity: physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle, complementing academic work elsewhere in the Diploma Programme.

Service: an unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit for the student. The rights, dignity and autonomy of all those involved are respected.

CAS enables students to enhance their personal and interpersonal development through experiential learning. At the same time, it provides an important counterbalance to the academic pressures of the rest of the Diploma Programme. A good CAS programme should be both challenging and enjoyable, a personal journey of self-discovery. Each individual student has a different starting point, and therefore different goals and needs, but for many their CAS activities include experiences that are profound and life changing.

Aims of the Programme

The CAS programme aims to develop students who are:

  • reflective thinkers—they understand their own strengths and limitations, identify goals and devise strategies for personal growth;
  • willing to accept new challenges and new roles;
  • aware of themselves as members of communities with responsibilities towards each other and the environment;
  • active participants in sustained, collaborative projects;
  • balanced—they enjoy and find significance in a range of activities involving intellectual, physical, creative and emotional experiences.
Objectives

Because of their CAS experience as a whole, including their reflections, there should be evidence that students have:

  • increased their awareness of their own strengths and areas for growth;
  • undertaken new challenges;
  • planned and initiated activities;
  • worked collaboratively with others;
  • shown perseverance and commitment in their activities;
  • engaged with issues of global importance;
  • considered the ethical implications of their actions;
  • developed new skills.
Student Requirements

Students are required to:

  • self review at the beginning of their CAS experience and set personal goals for what they hope to achieve through their CAS programme;
  • plan, do and reflect (plan activities, carry them out and reflect on what they have learned);
  • undertake at least one interim review and a final review with the CAS coordinator;
  • take part in a range of activities, including at least one project, some of which they have initiated themselves;
  • keep records of their activities and achievements, including a list of the principal activities undertaken;
  • show evidence of achievement of the eight CAS learning outcomes.
Evaluation of the Programme

The most important aspect of evaluation is self-evaluation by the student. The school should provide students with formative feedback on progress and offer guidance on future activities. The school also makes the final decision on completion, which is reported to
the IB regional office. There is no other assessment of student performance in CAS.

Recording & Reporting

Students should document their CAS activities, noting in particular their reflections upon their experiences. This documentation may take many forms, including weblogs, illustrated displays and videos, and written notes. Its extent should match the significance of the particular activity to the student. While it is important to encourage students to make an early start on their CAS log, there is no point in writing lengthy accounts about relatively routine experiences.

There should be consultations between each student and a CAS adviser as necessary, at least twice in year 1 and once in year 2, where the student’s progress is discussed and appropriate encouragement and advice is given. These consultations should be briefly documented on a simple CAS progress form. If any concerns arise, especially about whether a student will successfully complete the CAS requirement, these should be noted and appropriate action should be taken at the earliest opportunity.

The school will record the completion decision for each student, noting the evidence for each learning outcome. This decision is reported to the regional office, as specified in the Handbook of procedures for the Diploma Programme. Non-completion of the program results in no award of the IB Certificate.

Physical Education

Physical Education is a required course for all students.

This course focuses on the development of a healthy lifestyle and participation in a variety of enjoyable physical activities that have the potential to engage students’ interest throughout their lives.

Students will be encouraged to develop personal competence in a variety of movement skills and will be given opportunities to practise goal-setting, decision-making, social, and interpersonal skills. Students will also study the components of healthy relationships, mental health, and personal safety.